Macros Reference Guide

This document is a handy reference guide that acts as the official summary of each of the macro nodes in the Domemaster Fusion Macros toolset.

Macros Menu

Table of Contents

Conversion Macros

Filter Macros

Mask Macros

Miscellaneous Macros

Renderer3D Macros

Stereoscopic Macros

Transform Macros

UV Pass Macros

Viewer Macros

AlphaMaskErode

AlphaMaskErode GUI

The AlphaMaskErode macro helps dilate/erode, and blur the edge of an alpha mask. This is useful for smoothly blending together multi-camera panoramic 360° footage that was stitched in PTgui with the "individual layers" or "individual HDR layers" export options.

This node is great for contracting the border of an alpha channel when doing masking on tripod removal tasks, or to help smooth the junction of UV pass converted panoramic imagery when you have overlapping hard edges on the image layers you want to composite together.

AlphaMaskErode Macro

The "Erode Filter" control is used to specify if you want to shrink the alpha channel using a hard "box" style erode/dilate setting, or you could use a soft and smooth "Gaussian" type of erode/dilate effect.

The "Erode Lock X/Y" control is used to choose if you want to control the alpha channel contracting "Erode Amount" with one linked control, or with two separate horizontal (Erode X Amount) and vertical (Erode Y Amount) controls.

The "Erode Amount" control is used to expand/shrink the alpha channel mask border using an erode/dilate type of image filtering effect. You can contract the alpha channel inwards in different geometric ways depending on your choice of "Erode Filter" setting. The Box filter gives a hard edge contraction, and Gaussian filter will be very soft and diffused.

The "Blue Filter" control is used to specify what type of smoothing effect is used when the blur is generated. Generally speaking "Gaussian" is a good choice for almost all use cases.

The "Blur Lock X/Y" control is used to choose if you want to control the alpha channel frame blurring "Blur Size" with one linked control, or with two separate horizontal (Blur X Size) and vertical (Blur Y Size) controls.

The "Blur Size" control is used to soften and blur out the alpha channel mask after the erode control has been used to erode/dilate the mask border.

Note: The Blur controls should only be used if you are truly contracting the frame border smaller using the dilate erode options. If you are not watching what you are doing and have set the erode mode to dilate and expand the mask outwards, the blurred/feathered edge can add a slight clipped hard edge "cookie cutter" effect at the matte border!

The "Blur Blend" control is used to choose if you want to mix in a percentage of the original image with the blurred image result. A value of 1.0 will show only the blurred output, a value of 0.5 will show 50% of the blurred result mixed with 50% of the original unblurred image, and a value of 0.0 will show only the original unblurred image.

The output from the AlphaMaskErode node is called "output". Typically you would connect an RGBA image with an alpha channel into the AlphaMaskErode node and effect it directly.

You can also use the AlphaMaskErode node on an image that only has an alpha channel or a vector BSpline mask and then send the contracted / expanded shape result on to another node using the typical "Effect Mask" connection approach.

AlphaMaskErode Node

AlphaMaskMerge

AlphaMaskMerge GUI

The AlphaMaskMerge node allows you to merge an external alpha mask image / B-Spline mask with the current image data. Then an Alpha Multiply operation will clean up transparent areas in the image and fill them with black in the RGB channels by pre-multiplying the alpha channel data.

This macro cuts down on the node sprawl when creating a Fusion based UV Pass panoramic stitching project file.

AlphaMaskMerge Macro

Noe: If you set the AlphaMaskMerge node to "bypass" mode then the external alpha channel matte input will be skipped and the original RGB image will pass through the node unaffected.

The AlphaMaskMerge node has two inputs called "Image" and "EffectMask". The output from the AlphaMaskMerge node is called "output".

To use the AlphaMaskMerge node you would connect an RGB image to the "image" channel and a B-Spline mask to the "EffectMask" channel.

AlphaMaskMerge Node

Angular2CubicFaces

Angular2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a full frame angular fisheye/angular IBL/light probe image with a 360° diagonal FOV and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders allow you to rotate your panoramic imagery before it is converted into a cubemap output. This is handy for leveling horizons or adjusting the front facing image view. The Z Rotation will be the most used rotation control as it lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the panoramic imagery which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panorama.

Angular2CubicFaces Macro

To use this node, the angular fisheye source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

Angular2CubicFaces Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

Angular2Equirectangular

Angular2Equirectangular GUI

This macro converts a full frame angular fisheye/angular IBL/light probe image with a 360° diagonal FOV into an equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama with a 360° x 180° FOV with an aspect ratio of 2:1.

Angular2Equirectangular Macro

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the imagery. The final width for the panoramic image conversion will be twice the Input Height value due to the fact LatLong panoramas have a natural 2:1 aspect ratio.

This means a fisheye image with a 2048x2048 resolution will be converted into a 4096x2048 resolution LatLong image.

To use this node, the angular fisheye source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. The image output from the node is called "Output".

Angular2Equirectangular Node

This conversion is done with the help of the polar to rectangular coordinates filter.

Angular2MeshUV

Angular2MeshUV GUI

This node allows you to reformat panoramic imagery from the angular fisheye projection to an arbitrary image projection of your own design that is defined using an FBX/OBJ/DAE/3DS/Alembic format polygon mesh and a custom UV Layout.

The new MeshUV macros are able to support HDRI high dynamic range 16-bit and 32-bit per channel color depth based panoramic image conversions which are essential when dealing with 360° media that will be used as source imagery for an IBL (image based lighting) workflow.

The following image shows the result of an angular fisheye 360° image (on the left) being converted into the Facebook cube map 3x2 image projection format (on the right) using the Angular2MeshUV macro node with sample OBJ mesh file Macros:/Domemaster Fusion Macros/Images/facebook_cubemap3x2.obj loaded in the macro node's "FBX File" text field.

Angular2MeshUV

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the 360° angular fisheye imagery that is loaded into the node.

The "FBX File" text field and file browser button allows you to select an OBJ/FBX/DAE/3DS/Alembic based polygon mesh file from your hard disk.

The "Render Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the final rendered Mesh UV output.

The "Render Width" control is used to specify the horizontal resolution of the final rendered Mesh UV output.

The "Cull Front Face" and "Cull Back Face" checkboxes allow you to hide hidden parts of a mesh if you have overlapping regions or reversed faces/normals on the Mesh UV based geometry that is loaded in the FBX File section of the node.

The "UV Gutter Size" control allows you to extend the edge texture map color beyond the border zone region of each of the texture baked polygon mesh based UV Layout regions.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The X Offset/Y Offset/Z Offset sliders allow you to translate the model around the virtual world inside the Fusion 3D scene prior to performing the texture baking effect.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The "X Rotation", "Y Rotation", and "Z Rotation" values allow you to pan the panoramic footage as it is mapped onto the texture baking mesh geometry.

The "Y Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera rig which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic rendering.

The "X Pivot", "Y Pivot", "Z Pivot" lets you move the rotation and offset (translation) origin point that is used when the base mesh is loaded into the texture baking world.

The "Lock X/Y/Z" checkbox will link together the "Scale" control into a single unified slider. When this slider is un-checked you will have direct control over the Scale X/Scale Y/Scale Z controls which allow for non-proportional scaling.

The Scale control allows you to change the size of the mesh used in the texture baking operation. If the model is extremely large or small it can be helpful to change the scale setting control so the model fits within Fusion's default near and far clipping plane regions.

If you disable the "Lock X/Y/Z" checkbox you can create cartoon like squash and stretch distortions in the environment map imagery by doubling the Scale value on a single axis in relation to the other scale controls.

The node has one input which is labelled "Image". The node has a single output called "Output".

Angular2MeshUV Node

Note: If the environment map to Mesh UV texture baking operation doesn't seem to have the correct "infinite" like look to the conversion it is usually an indication the scale control needs to be adjusted to fix the issue.

BlurPanoramicWrap

BlurPanoramicWrap GUI

The BlurPanoramicWrap node applies a soft blurring effect that is panoramic 360° aware and wraps around the left/right frame border edges to avoid a visual seam artifact that would happen if you used Fusion's built in blur node.

In this example the BlurPanoramicWrap macro is used to create a title graphic with the Text+ character generator applied as an effects mask. The alpha channel on the text is inverted so it results in the background of the image being filled with a soft blurry effect while the text is clear.

BlurPanoramicWrap

The Red/Green/Blue/Alpha checkbox controls allow you to toggle the output of the blur filter effect per channel in the image.

The "Lock X/Y" checkbox allows you to choose if you want the Blur Size control to be uniform on the X and Y axis. If you disable the the "Lock X/Y" checkbox then you can individually adjust the Blur Size with a pair of "X Blur Size" and "Y Blur Size" controls.

The "Blur Size" control allows you to change the radius of the blur effect.

The gradient controls at the bottom of the node parameters in the GUI along with the gradient "line" placement control in the viewer window allow you to sculpt the fade-off of the blur effect. This can be used to good effect to make the pole regions clearer and less blurry in an equirectangular image. The Red channel in the gradient control drives the effect with 0 equalling no blur, and 1 equalling a full strength blur.

The "Blend" control allows you to mix a percentage of the original image back into the blur effect rendered image.

You can also use the effect mask control input to add your own vector mask or greyscale map to control where the blur effect is applied.

BlurPanoramicWrap Node

ColorCorrectorMasked

ColorCorrectorMasked GUI

This node is a hybrid color corrector that allows you to use an internal gradient generator to selectively apply color correction to an image.

This is useful for example, if you want to target the color correction effect on a specific part of the frame using a linear gradient to fade off the strength of the color correction. This can help target the adjustments to the Zenith/Nadir pole regions, or for the left and right seam edge of a LatLong frame.

The ColorCorrectorMasked node is also good for applying graduated neutral density filter style color corrections that can restore the details in the cloud and sky region of a panorama.

You can control the gradient's start position and end position visually using either the red or green colored square box control handles in the viewer window when the node is selected, or numerically by entering the raw position values in the node settings.

ColorCorrectorMasked

The "Width" control is used to specify the horizontal resolution of the gradient mask used for the color correction.

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the gradient mask used for the color correction.

The "Depth" control is use to specify the gradient mask's bit depth / color precision. The "Default" setting for the Depth control is usually fine. If you are working with high dynamic range imagery and need to avoid banding artifacts on the gradient effect you can try either the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options.

The Linear/Reflect/Square/Cross/Radial/Angle buttons let you choose what gradient mode is used when masking the color corrector effect. The Linear or Radial options are used about 90% of the time. If you are working with a LatLong image projection you will likely use the linear mode all of the time. If you are working with an angular fisheye or "Domemaster" image you will probably want to experiment with the radial mode.

The "Start" and "End" controls let you choose the beginning and ending zones for the color correction effect masking. You can visually control these settings in the viewer window with the two small box control handles, or you can numerically adjust these settings in the node settings.

This is an example of targeting the color correction effect on the vertical axis by setting the gradient control handles to Start X=0.5 Y=1.0 and End X=0.5 Y=0.5:

ColorCorrectorMasked Vertical Control Handles GUI

ColorCorrectorMasked Vertical Control Handles

This is an example of targeting the color correction effect on the horizontal axis by setting the gradient control handles to Start X=1.0 Y=0.5 and End X=0.5 Y=0.5:

ColorCorrectorMasked Horizontal Control Handles GUI

ColorCorrectorMasked Horizontal Control Handles

Tip: Typically I will drag the control handles to their rough position in the viewer window using the visual control handles, and then round those values off to a precise setting by adjusting the start and end numeric values to lock a specific handle to either: the edge of the frame, the exact middle point of the frame, or to keep the gradient perfectly horizontally or vertically aligned with no leaning or tilting effect.

The Gradient color control sliders allow you to add more control handles to the gradient ramp, or to adjust the RBA values numerically. As a note, the alpha channel "A" slider in the gradient color sliders section is what controls the masking effect, not the RGB channels color sliders.

You can move the low and high points on the gradient by pulling the triangular controls that are located below the gradient band in the node settings:

ColorCorrectorMasked

The remaining visual controls in the ColorCorrectorMasked node are identical feature wise to the standard Fusion Color Corrector node.

If you need more control for the placement of the masking and color correction effects, you can always stack up several of the ColorCorrectorMasked nodes in a row connected to each other if you want to control the color correction on different parts of the frame.

The ColorCorrectorMasked node and the AlphaMaskErode nodes are primarily designed to work with imagery that was stitched and warped in a program like PTgui with the individual layers mode enabled. This gives you footage that is ready for use with a compositing package and means you can easily refine the stitching and blending on each view from a multi-camera panoramic 360° rig.

A pair of AlphaDivide and AlphaMultiply nodes are internally connected to the ColorCorrectorMasked node so you don't have to worry about pre-multiplication artifacts showing up like elevated black levels.

Tip: You should start by entering the current image's width and height settings at the top of the ColorCorrectorMasked node settings before you begin using the node. If these settings aren't set correctly the masking effect won't line up with the frame size.

To use the ColorCorrectorMasked node, the source imagery is connected to the node's "Input" attribute. There is a single output from the node called "Output".

ColorCorrectorMasked Node

Cubemap3x22CubicFaces

Cubemap3x22CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a cubemap 3x2 panoramic format image with a 3:2 aspect ratio and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

Cubemap3x22CubicFaces Macro

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

A cubemap 3x2 panorama has the faces oriented in the following order:

Front Right Back
Left Top Bottom

To use this node, the cubemap 3x2 source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

Cubemap3x22CubicFaces Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

CubicFaces2Cubemap3x2

CubicFaces2Cubemap3x2 GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a 3x2 cube map face arrangement.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of each of the merged cubic views. The final width and height for the cubemap 3x2 images will be an image width of three times the Input Height value, and an image height of two times the Input Height value. This is due to the fact each of the cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio, and the document consists of three cubemap images horizontally, and two cubemap images high.

CubicFaces2Cubemap3x2 Macro

A cubemap 3x2 panorama has the faces oriented in the following order:

Front Right Back
Left Top Bottom

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source imagery is connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged cubemap 3x2 frame.

CubicFaces2Cubemap3x2 Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the colored triangle inputs on the node you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected input is called.

CubicFaces2Cylindrical

CubicFaces2Cylindrical GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined cylindrical image.

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution. The final width for the cylindrical panoramic output will be an image width of four times the Height value. This is due to the fact each of the cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio, and the cylindrical document consists of four cubemap images horizontally.

CubicFaces2Cubemap3x2 Macro

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source imagery is connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged cylindrical frame.

CubicFaces2Cylindrical Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the colored triangle inputs on the node you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected input is called.

CubicFaces2Domemaster180

CubicFaces2Domemaster180 GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined angular fisheye 180° FOV image that is known as a domemaster image. A domemaster image has an aspect ratio of 1:1.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the final domemaster frame.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders allow you to rotate your cubic panoramic imagery before it is converted into a domemaster output. This is handy for leveling horizons or adjusting the front facing image view. The Z Rotation will be the most used rotation control as it lets you perform a horizontal rotation effect on the panoramic imagery which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panorama.

CubicFaces2Domemaster180 Macro

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source imagery is connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged domemaster 180° frame.

CubicFaces2Domemaster180 Node

Note: Gimbal lock can happen on the X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders so you will have to pull the X Rotation value off from its initial -90 setting if you want to use the Y Rotation and Z Rotation sliders.

CubicFaces2Equirectangular

CubicFaces2Equirectangular GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined equirectangular/LatLong/spherical 360°x180° FOV image. An equirectangular image has an aspect ratio of 2:1.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the final domemaster frame.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders allow you to rotate your cubic panoramic imagery before it is converted into an equirectangular output. This is handy for leveling horizons or adjusting the front facing image view. The Z Rotation will be the most used rotation control as it lets you perform a horizontal rotation effect on the panoramic imagery which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panorama.

CubicFaces2Equirectangular Macro

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source imagery is connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged equirectangular frame.

CubicFaces2Equirectangular Node

Note: Gimbal lock can happen on the X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders so you might have to change the "Rotation Order" control to set a different priority for the rotation channels.

CubicFaces2FacebookCubemap3x2

CubicFaces2FacebookCubemap3x2 GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a Facebook 3x2 cube map face arrangement.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of each of the merged cubic views. The final width and height for the Facebook cubemap 3x2 images will be an image width of three times the Input Height value, and an image height of two times the Input Height value. This is due to the fact each of the cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio, and the document consists of three cubemap images horizontally, and two cubemap images high.

CubicFaces2FacebookCubemap3x2 Macro

A Facebook cubemap 3x2 panorama has the faces oriented in the following order:

Right Left Top
Bottom Front Back

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source imagery is connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged Facebook cubemap 3x2 frame.

CubicFaces2FacebookCubemap3x2 Node

As another example, if you wanted to convert a LatLong/equirectangular/spherical image to the Facebook Cubemap 3x2 format you would connect the nodes like this in Fusion:

Converting from LatLong to Facebook Cubemap 3x2

In this picture a LatLong format image is brought into Fusion with a Loader node. The Loader node is connected to an Equirctangular2CubicFaces node that will convert the LatLong panorama to a set of six 90° FOV cubic images. These six images are then routed into a CubicFaces2FacebookCubemap3x2 node where they are merged into the final cubemap 3x2 format frame. Then lastly a saver node is connected to the end of the comp to save the resulting media file to disk.

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the colored triangle inputs on the node you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected input is called.

CubicFaces2FacebookVerticalStrip

CubicFaces2FacebookVerticalStrip GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a Facebook Vertical Strip face arrangement.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of each of the merged cubic views. The final width and height for the Facebook Vertical Strip image will be an image width of the Input Height value, and an image height of six times the Input Height value. This is due to the fact each of the cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio, and the document consists of six cubemap images high.

CubicFaces2FacebookVerticalStrip Macro

A Facebook Vertical Strip panorama has all of the images flipped horizontally and the faces are oriented in the following order:

right
left
top (Rotated 180°)
bottom (Rotated 180°)
back
front

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source imagery is connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged Facebook Vertical Strip frame.

CubicFaces2FacebookVerticalStrip Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the colored triangle inputs on the node you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected input is called.

CubicFaces2GearVRMono

CubicFaces2GearVRMono GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a Gear VR/Octane ORBX/Vray Cubic face arrangement. A Gear VR mono image has an aspect ratio of 6:1.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of each of the merged cubic views. The final width of the Gear VR mono panorama will be six times the Input Height value to create the final 6:1 aspect ratio image.

CubicFaces2GearVRMono Macro

A Gear VR mono panorama has the faces oriented in the following order:

Left Right Top (Rotated 180°) Bottom (Rotated 180°) Back Front

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged Gear VR mono frame.

CubicFaces2GearVRMono Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the colored triangle inputs on the node you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected input is called.

CubicFaces2GearVRStereo

CubicFaces2GearVRStereo GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a Gear VR/Octane ORBX/Vray Cubic face arrangement. A Gear VR Stereo image has an aspect ratio of 12:1.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of each of the merged cubic views. The final width of the Gear VR Stereo panorama will be twelve times the Input Height value to create the final 12:1 aspect ratio image.

CubicFaces2GearVRStereo Macro

A Gear VR stereo panorama has a side by side stereo format that has the right camera views placed first then the left camera views placed second. The right (R) and left (L) camera cubic faces are oriented in the following order:

R-Left R-Right R-Top (Rotated 180°) R-Bottom (Rotated 180°) R-Back R-Front L-Left L-Right L-Top (Rotated 180°) L-Bottom (Rotated 180°) L-Back L-Front

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored inputs named LeftCam_Front, LeftCam_Right, LeftCam_Back, LeftCam_Left, LeftCam_Top, LeftCam_Bottom, RightCam_Front, RightCam_Right, RightCam_Back, RightCam_Left, RightCam_Top, and RightCam_Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged Gear VR stereo frame.

CubicFaces2GearVRStereo Node

Don't forget as you are connecting image inputs to a node, you can hold down the Alt/Option key as you drag a connection line to the middle of the node and as you release your mouse button a connection popup dialog will appear that makes it easier to wire up the node inputs by name.

CubicFaces2GearVRStereo Connections

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the colored triangle inputs on the node you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected input is called.

CubicFaces2HorizontalCross

CubicFaces2HorizontalCross GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a horizontal cross cube map face arrangement. A horizontal cross image has an aspect ratio of 4:3.

CubicFaces2HorizontalCross Macro

The converted horizontal cross faces are located in the format:

Blank Top Blank Blank
Left Front Right Back
Blank Bottom Blank Blank

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged panoramic frame.

CubicFaces2HorizontalCross Node

CubicFaces2HorizontalStrip

CubicFaces2HorizontalStrip GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a horizontal strip cube map face arrangement. A horizontal strip image has an aspect ratio of 6:1.

CubicFaces2HorizontalStrip Macro

The horizontal strip faces are located in the format:

Front Right Back Left Top Bottom

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged panoramic frame.

CubicFaces2HorizontalStrip Node

CubicFaces2HorizontalTee

CubicFaces2HorizontalTee GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a horizontal tee cube map face arrangement. A horizontal tee image has an aspect ratio of 4:3.

CubicFaces2HorizontalTee Macro

The converted horizontal tee faces are located in the format:

Top Blank Blank Blank
Front Right Back Left
Bottom Blank Blank Blank

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged panoramic frame.

CubicFaces2HorizontalTee Node

CubicFaces2MeshUV

CubicFaces2MeshUV GUI

This node allows you to reformat panoramic imagery from the cubic projection to an arbitrary image projection of your own design that is defined using an FBX/OBJ/DAE/3DS/Alembic format polygon mesh and a custom UV Layout.

The new MeshUV macros are able to support HDRI high dynamic range 16-bit and 32-bit per channel color depth based panoramic image conversions which are essential when dealing with 360° media that will be used as source imagery for an IBL (image based lighting) workflow.

The following image shows the result of a set of six cubemap images (the front view visible on the left) being converted into the Facebook cube map 3x2 image projection format (on the right) using the CubicFaces2MeshUV macro node with sample OBJ mesh file Macros:/Domemaster Fusion Macros/Images/facebook_cubemap3x2.obj loaded in the macro node's "FBX File" text field.

CubicFaces2MeshUV GUI

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the 360° angular fisheye imagery that is loaded into the node.

The "FBX File" text field and file browser button allows you to select an OBJ/FBX/DAE/3DS/Alembic based polygon mesh file from your hard disk.

The "Render Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the final rendered Mesh UV output.

The "Render Width" control is used to specify the horizontal resolution of the final rendered Mesh UV output.

The "Cull Front Face" and "Cull Back Face" checkboxes allow you to hide hidden parts of a mesh if you have overlapping regions or reversed faces/normals on the Mesh UV based geometry that is loaded in the FBX File section of the node.

The "UV Gutter Size" control allows you to extend the edge texture map color beyond the border zone region of each of the texture baked polygon mesh based UV Layout regions.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The X Offset/Y Offset/Z Offset sliders allow you to translate the model around the virtual world inside the Fusion 3D scene prior to performing the texture baking effect.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The "X Rotation", "Y Rotation", and "Z Rotation" values allow you to pan the panoramic footage as it is mapped onto the texture baking mesh geometry.

The "Y Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera rig which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic rendering.

The "X Pivot", "Y Pivot", "Z Pivot" lets you move the rotation and offset (translation) origin point that is used when the base mesh is loaded into the texture baking world.

The "Lock X/Y/Z" checkbox will link together the "Scale" control into a single unified slider. When this slider is un-checked you will have direct control over the Scale X/Scale Y/Scale Z controls which allow for non-proportional scaling.

The Scale control allows you to change the size of the mesh used in the texture baking operation. If the model is extremely large or small it can be helpful to change the scale setting control so the model fits within Fusion's default near and far clipping plane regions.

If you disable the "Lock X/Y/Z" checkbox you can create cartoon like squash and stretch distortions in the environment map imagery by doubling the Scale value on a single axis in relation to the other scale controls.

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source imagery is connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output".

CubicFaces2MeshUV Node

Note: If the environment map to Mesh UV texture baking operation doesn't seem to have the correct "infinite" like look to the conversion it is usually an indication the scale control needs to be adjusted to fix the issue.

CubicFaces2MrCube1Map

CubicFaces2MrCube1Map GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a mental ray cube1 horizontal strip face arrangement. A mental ray cube1 image has an aspect ratio of 6:1.

CubicFaces2MrCube1Map Macro

The converted mental ray mib_lookup_cube1 horizontal strip faces are located in the format:

Left Right Bottom Top (Flipped Vertically) Back Front

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged panoramic frame.

CubicFaces2MrCube1Map Node

CubicFaces2VerticalCross

CubicFaces2VerticalCross GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a vertical cross cube map face arrangement. A vertical cross image has an aspect ratio of 3:4.

CubicFaces2VerticalCross Macro

The converted vertical cross faces are located in the format:

Blank Top Blank
Left Front Right
Blank Bottom Blank
Blank Back (Rotated 180°) Blank

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged panoramic frame.

CubicFaces2VerticalCross Node

CubicFaces2VerticalStrip

CubicFaces2VerticalStrip GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a vertical strip cube map face arrangement. A vertical strip image has an aspect ratio of 1:6.

CubicFaces2VerticalStrip Macro

The vertical strip faces are located in the format:

Front
Right
Back
Left
Top
Bottom

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged panoramic frame.

CubicFaces2VerticalStrip Node

CubicFaces2VerticalTee

CubicFaces2VerticalTee GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and merges them into a single combined image with a vertical tee cube map face arrangement. A vertical tee image has an aspect ratio of 3:4.

CubicFaces2VerticalTee Macro

The converted vertical tee faces are located in the format:

Left Front Right
Blank BottomBlank
Blank Back (Rotated 180°) Blank
Blank Top Blank

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which creates a merged panoramic frame.

CubicFaces2VerticalTee Node

CubicRenderer3D

CubicRenderer3D GUI

The CubicRenderer3D macro creates a monoscopic "2D" cubic panorama camera rig that renders out six 90° FOV views and works with Fusion's native 3D animation system. You can wire this macro node into your Shape3D nodes and then can generate panoramic 360° output from your 3D compositing environment.

This node would typically be connected to either one of the nodes like CubicFaces2VerticalCross and could be used as an environment map.

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the rendered cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The "Renderer Type" options menu allows you to choose if you want to use the Fusion Software Renderer or the OpenGL Renderer to drive the panoramic 360° media viewer graphics context. You can compare the performance of both options to see which one works best with your GPU or CPU and delivers the fastest interactive performance.

You have the option of enabling several different render channels. The default option is RGBA which gives you a standard color image output from the CubicRenderer3D node.

The Z channel gives you a z-depth pass from the scene. The other attributes like Coverage, BGColor, Normal, TexCoord0, ObjectID, MaterialID, WorldCoord, Vector, and BackVector are not as commonly used.

The Enable Lighting and Enable Shadows options are useful for creating photorealistic renderings from Fusion's 3D animation system.

The X Offset/Y Offset/Z Offset sliders allow you to translate the cubic camera rig around the virtual world inside the Fusion 3D scene.

The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera rig which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic rendering.

To use this node, the Fusion 3D scene's output is connected to the node's yellow colored "SceneInput1" attribute. There are six rendered image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

This example shows how you might route elements from the Fusion 3D system into the CubicRenderer3D node and then send the cubic output into a vertical cross panoramic output format.

CubicRenderer3D Node 1

This example shows how you might route elements from the Fusion 3D system into the CubicRenderer3D node and then send the six cubic outputs to the Comp-Fu Cube to LatLong fuse and then route that into a set of merge nodes to create a finished LatLong panoramic frame.

CubicRenderer3D Node 2

Cylindrical2CubicFaces

Cylindrical2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a 360° x 90° cylindrical panorama and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

Cylindrical2CubicFaces Macro

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders allow you to rotate your panoramic imagery before it is converted into a cubemap output. This is handy for leveling horizons or adjusting the front facing image view. The Z Rotation will be the most used rotation control as it lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the panoramic imagery which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panorama.

Cylindrical2CubicFaces Node

To use this node, the cylindrical source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

CylindricalRenderer3D

CylindricalRenderer3D GUI

The CylindricalRenderer3D macro creates a monoscopic "2D" cylindrical panorama camera rig that renders out a cylindrical 360° x 90° view and works with Fusion's native 3D animation system. You can wire this macro node into your Shape3D nodes and then can generate panoramic animations from your 3D compositing environment.

CylindricalRenderer3D

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the rendered cylindrical view.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The Enable Lighting and Enable Shadows options are useful for creating photorealistic renderings from Fusion's 3D animation system.

The X Offset/Y Offset/Z Offset sliders allow you to translate the camera rig around the virtual world inside the Fusion 3D scene.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the domemaster camera view around and can be used to level the horizon or adjust the front facing view.

To use this node, the Fusion 3D scene's output is connected to the node's yellow colored "SceneInput1" attribute. There is one rendered image output from the node called "Output".

CylindricalRenderer3D Node

CylindricalRenderer3DAdvanced

CylindricalRenderer3D GUI

The CylindricalRenderer3D macro creates a monoscopic "2D" cylindrical panorama camera rig that renders out a cylindrical 360° x 90° view and works with Fusion's native 3D animation system. You can wire this macro node into your Shape3D nodes and then can generate panoramic animations from your 3D compositing environment.

CylindricalRenderer3DAdvanced

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the rendered cylindrical view.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

You have the option of enabling several different render channels. The default option is RGBA which gives you a standard color image output from the CylindricalRenderer3DAdvanced node.

The Z channel gives you a z-depth pass from the scene. The other attributes like Coverage, BGColor, TexCoord0, ObjectID, MaterialID, WorldCoord, are not as commonly used.

The Enable Lighting and Enable Shadows options are useful for creating photorealistic renderings from Fusion's 3D animation system.

The X Offset/Y Offset/Z Offset sliders allow you to translate the camera rig around the virtual world inside the Fusion 3D scene.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the domemaster camera view around and can be used to level the horizon or adjust the front facing view.

To use this node, the Fusion 3D scene's output is connected to the node's yellow colored "SceneInput1" attribute. There is one rendered image output from the node called "Output".

CylindricalRenderer3DAdvanced Node

You might have to enable the viewer window's normalize icon (that looks a bit like two gradient bars) to be able to properly view channels like WorldCoord (Positions) or the Z channel (Depth).

The ChannelBoolean node can be used to extract one of these additional channels from the rendered image.

DefocusPanoramicWrap

DefocusPanoramicWrap GUI

The DefocusPanoramicWrap node applies a defocus / bokeh lens blur effect that is panoramic 360° aware and wraps around the left/right frame border edges to avoid a visual seam artifact that would happen if you used Fusion's built in Defocus node.

DefocusPanoramicWrap

The "Filter" control is used to choose if you want a slow to render but high quality "Lens" blur with a shaped out of focus bokeh region, or a faster to render "Gaussian Blur" that is uniform in its shape.

The "Defocus Size" is the primary control for adjusting the blurriness of the defocus effect.

The "Bloom Level" and "Bloom Threshold" allow you to control how the highlights are blown out in the out of focus regions in the image.

The "Lens Type" control allows you to choose the shape of the bokeh blur effect. You can choose to use a polygonal shape with a variable number of sides, or a pure circular bokeh blur geometry.

The "Lens Angle", "Lens Sides", and "Lens Shape" controls adjust the look of the shaped blur region.

The Lens Sides control only applies when you have the Lens Type control set to one of the NGon options. This lets you have a hexagon, octogon, or higher number of polygon sides present in each bokeh spot.

The "Use OpenCL" checkbox allow you to choose if you want to render the effect on the CPU or using your GPU. If you are rendering a bokeh blur with either a high resolution image, or with a large defocus size you will likely have to use the CPU option (which means having the "Use OpenCL" checkbox disabled).

The "Blend" control allows you to mix a percentage of the original image back into the defocus effect rendered image.

The gradient controls at the bottom of the node parameters in the GUI along with the gradient "line" placement control in the viewer window allow you to sculpt the fade-off of the defocus effect. This can be used to good effect to make the pole regions clearer and less blurry in an equirectangular image. The Red channel in the gradient control drives the effect with 0 equalling no defocus, and 1 equalling a full strength defocus.

You can also use the effect mask control input to add your own vector mask or greyscale map to control where the defocus effect is applied.

DefocusPanoramicWrap node

DepthBlurPanoramicWrap

DepthBlurPanoramicWrap GUI

The DepthBlurPanoramicWrap node applies a depthmap driven variable defocus / bokeh style lens blur kind of effect that is panoramic 360° aware and wraps around the left/right frame border edges to avoid a visual seam artifact that would happen if you used Fusion's built in DepthBlur node.

This image is a DepthBlurPanoramicWrap example from the included compositing file "Stereo 3D Roto Conversion.comp".

DepthBlurPanoramicWrap

This image below shows the rotoscope drawn greyscale depth map that was connect to the "depth" input on the DepthBlurPanoramicWrap node to create the varying depth of field effect. The depthmap image is also an element from the demo file "Stereo 3D Roto Conversion.comp".

DepthBlurPanoramicWrap

The "Depth Blur Channel" is set to Luma (Luminance) by default. This is used to let the node known what RGB/A/Z channel is providing the required depthmap information to the node's "depth" input connection.

The "Depth Blur Filter" control is used to choose if you want a slow to render but high quality lens blur effect with the "Super Soften" mode, a medium fast to render "Soften" mode, or a quick to render but cubic looking blur with the "Box" option.

The "Depth Blur Size" control adjusts the overall blurriness of the defocus effect.

The DepthBlurPanoramicWrap node has three inputs: An "image" input for the panoramic media, a "depth" input for the depthmap imagery, and an "Effect Mask" which can be used to disable the depth blur effect selectively in the frame.

DepthBlurPanoramicWrap Node

DisplaceEquirectangular

DisplaceEquirectangular GUI

The DisplaceEquirectangular macro node pushes and pulls the pixels in a panoramic 360° image to turn a 2D panorama into a stereosopic 3D panoramic output by generating the extra missing eye camera view required to have a stereo pair image. The displacement effect is wrapped around the left/right frame border edge to create a seamless result.

Here is a wiggle format GIF animation that shows the generated "in between" stereoscopic camera views that are possible to create from an original 2D mono panorama with this node. This image was created using the included demo file "Stereo 3D Roto Conversion.comp" that also has an over/under stereo image output as well that can be viewed on an HMD.

DisplaceEquirectangular Wiggle Animation

This image below shows the rotoscope drawn greyscale depth map that was connect to the "depth" input on the DisplaceEquirectangular node to create the above wiggle animation. Each of the rotosplines are give a specific greyscale shaded depth value from 0-1 which represents the depth from the back of the world to the front of the scene. The depthmap image is also an element from the demo file "Stereo 3D Roto Conversion.comp".

DisplaceEquirectangular Depth map

The "Depth Input Channel" button is set to Luma (Luminance) by default. This control is used to let the node known what RGB/A/Luminance channel is providing the required depthmap information to the node's "depth" input connection.

The "Stereo Convergence" control provides a horizontal offset style of control to shift the simulated "zero parallax point" in the displacement effect which allows you to choose where the neutral depth is in the scene.

The "Stereo Depth Displacement" control is the primary control for this node and it is used to shift all of the pixels in the image horizontally based upon the greyscale value of the depthmap image. This can be used to excellent effect to create a 2D monoscopic to 3D stereo image conversion.

The "Depth Blur Filter" control allows you to choose the style of depth map blurring you want to apply. Gaussian is the smoothest choice available.

The "Depth Blur Size" control allows you to smooth out the differences in the depth map image details that are connected to the "depth" input on the node before the displacement effect is applied. This can even out large disparities in the depthmap and remove high frequency noise.

The DisplaceEquirectangular node has three inputs: An "image" input for the panoramic media, a "depth" input for the depthmap imagery, and an "Effect Mask" which can be used to disable the displacement effect selectively in the frame.

DisplaceEquirectangular Node

Domemaster2Equirectangular

Domemaster2Equirectangular GUI

This macro converts a 180° domemaster angular fisheye image into a 360° x 180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama with an aspect ratio of 2:1.

Since a domemaster frame only has a vertical coverage area of 90 degrees when converted into a spherical format, this image will have the bottom half of the spherical image output remain empty.

Domemaster2Equirectangular Macro

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the imagery. The final width for the panoramic image conversion will be twice the Input Height value due to the fact LatLong panoramas have a natural 2:1 aspect ratio.

To use this node, the 180 degree angular fisheye source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. The image output from the node is called "Output".

Domemaster2Equirectangular Node

This conversion is done with the help of the polar to rectangular coordinates filter.

DomemasterCrossbounceSim

DomemasterCrossbounceSim GUI

The DomemasterCrossbounceSim macro creates a simple fulldome crossbounce lighting simulation using fast 2D image operations. This crossbounce simulation mimics the contrast robbing effect that happens in a planetarium theater when video projectors are used to display imagery on a 180° hemispherical dome surface. The crossbounce light spill effect is caused by stray light bouncing across from one side of the hemisphere screen in a dome theater and will raise the ambient lighting levels on the opposite part of the dome screen.

Note: This macro is able to provide a blazing fast interactive preview of the crossbounce lighting issue because it skips the more complex stages of modeling the full theater environment such as the floor area of the room, the theater seating, walls, and the audience that a full global illumination based lighting simulation might be able to perform.

Here is a view of a raw crossbounce lighting simulation that was created with the "Crossbounce Blend" control set to 0:

DomemasterCrossbounceSim Fullcolor Macro

Here is a view of a raw crossbounce lighting simulation that was created with the "Crossbounce Blend" control set to 0, and the "Crossbounce Saturation" was set to 0 to create a desaturated greyscale / luminance style output:

DomemasterCrossbounceSim Greyscale Macro

This is a view of a crossbounce lighting simulation where the simulation data was automatically composited over the original fulldome plate footage. This was created by setting the "Crossbounce Blend" control to 1:

DomemasterCrossbounceSim Comped Macro

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the rendered domemaster view.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. It is a good idea to leave this setting at its default value of float 16. If you do want to change the Depth value you could also choose a float 32 mode.

The "Screen Gain" control is used to adjust the reflectivity of the dome theater's projection screen surface coating and can be thought of as an approximation of the albedo or reflection coefficient. The Screen Gain control will typically be set to a value between 0.1 and 0.25.

The "Crossbounce Saturation" control allows you to adjust the color purity of the crossbounced light. A setting of 1 means a fully detailed and saturated color will be used, a value of 0.5 will use 50% color saturation on the crossbounce reflected light, and a value of 0 will use the greyscale luminance intensity value when calculating the crossbounce light effect.

When the "Crossbounce Blend" control is set to 0 you get the raw crossbounce light contribution information. When the Crossbounce Blend control is set to 1.0 you get a combination of the crossbounce lighting simulation data that is then composited on top of the original fulldome imagery.

This example shows how you might create a crossbounce lighting simulation of fulldome imagery using the DomemasterCrossbounceSim node. The crossbounce sim output was then saved to disk with the help of a saver node.

DomemasterCrossbounceSim Node

This example shows how you can use a LatLong format source image as part of a fulldome crossbounce lighting simulation. For this screenshot the loader node opened up a LatLong format source image. Then an Equirectangular2Domemaster220 node was used to convert the original LatLong footage into a domemaster format before it was sent into the DomemasterCrossbounceSim node. After the crossbounce simulation was computed, the resulting fulldome format output was saved to disk.

DomemasterCrossbounceSim Node

DomemasterRenderer3D

DomemasterRenderer3D GUI

The DomemasterRenderer3D macro creates a monoscopic "2D" cubic panorama camera rig that renders out an angular fisheye 180° domemaster view and works with Fusion's native 3D animation system. You can wire this macro node into your Shape3D nodes and then can generate domemaster animations from your 3D compositing environment.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the rendered domemaster view.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

You have the option of enabling several different render channels. The default option is RGBA which gives you a standard color image output from the DomemasterRenderer3D node.

The Enable Lighting and Enable Shadows options are useful for creating photorealistic renderings from Fusion's 3D animation system.

The X Offset/Y Offset/Z Offset sliders allow you to translate the camera rig around the virtual world inside the Fusion 3D scene.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the domemaster camera view around and can be used to level the horizon or compensate for dome tilt.

The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera rig which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic rendering.

To use this node, the Fusion 3D scene's output is connected to the node's yellow colored "SceneInput1" attribute. There is one rendered image output from the node called "Output".

This example shows how you might route elements from the Fusion 3D system into the DomemasterRenderer3D node.

DomemasterRenderer3D Node

DomemasterRenderer3DAdvanced

DomemasterRenderer3DAdvanced GUI

The DomemasterRenderer3DAdvanced macro creates a monoscopic "2D" cubic panorama camera rig that renders out an angular fisheye 180° domemaster view and works with Fusion's native 3D animation system. You can wire this macro node into your Shape3D nodes and then can generate domemaster animations from your 3D compositing environment.

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the rendered domemaster view.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

You have the option of enabling several different render channels. The default option is RGBA which gives you a standard color image output from the DomemasterRenderer3DAdvanced node.

The Z channel gives you a z-depth pass from the scene. The other attributes like Coverage, BGColor, TexCoord0, ObjectID, MaterialID, WorldCoord, are not as commonly used.

The Enable Lighting and Enable Shadows options are useful for creating photorealistic renderings from Fusion's 3D animation system.

The X Offset/Y Offset/Z Offset sliders allow you to translate the camera rig around the virtual world inside the Fusion 3D scene.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the domemaster camera view around and can be used to level the horizon or compensate for dome tilt.

The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera rig which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic rendering.

To use this node, the Fusion 3D scene's output is connected to the node's yellow colored "SceneInput1" attribute. There is one rendered image output from the node called "Output".

This example shows how you might route elements from the Fusion 3D system into the DomemasterRenderer3D node.

DomemasterRenderer3DAdvanced Node

You might have to enable the viewer window's normalize icon (that looks a bit like two gradient bars) to be able to properly view channels like WorldCoord (Positions) or the Z channel (Depth).

The ChannelBoolean node can be used to extract one of these additional channels from the rendered image.

Equirectangular2Angular

Equirectangular2Angular GUI

This macro converts a 360° x 180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama into a full frame fisheye image. This means a LatLong image with a 2:1 aspect ratio like 4096x2048 pixels will be converted to a 2048x2048 angular fisheye image.

Equirectangular2Angular Macro

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the imagery. The final width for the panoramic image conversion will be the Input Height value due to the fact angular fisheye panoramas have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

To use this node, the equirectangular source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. The image output from the node is called "Output".

Equirectangular2Angular Node

This conversion is done with the help of the rectangular to polar coordinates filter.

Equirectangular2CubicFaces

Equirectangular2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a 360° x 180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

Equirectangular2CubicFaces Macro

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders allow you to rotate your panoramic imagery before it is converted into a cubemap output. This is handy for leveling horizons or adjusting the front facing image view. The Z Rotation will be the most used rotation control as it lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the panoramic imagery which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panorama.

Equirectangular2CubicFaces Node

To use this node, the equirectangular source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

Equirectangular2Cylindrical

Equirectangular2Cylindrical GUI

This macro takes a 360° x 180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama and converts it into a 360° x 90° cylindrical output.

Equirectangular2Cylindrical Macro

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be four times the Input Height value.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders allow you to rotate your panoramic imagery before it is converted into a cylindrical output. This is handy for leveling horizons or adjusting the front facing view. The Z Rotation will be the most used rotation control as it lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the panoramic imagery which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panorama.

Equirectangular2Cylindrical Node

To use this node, the equirectangular source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There image output from the node is called "Output".

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

Equirectangular2Domemaster180

Equirectangular2Domemaster180 GUI

This macro will take a 360°x180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama and convert it into a 180° angular fisheye image that has a circular appearance.

This conversion will use the upward (zenith) facing part of the equirectangular image and make that the center part of the domemaster 180° image output.

Equirectangular2Domemaster180 Macro

A typical domemaster image in a planetarium covers a 180° image area which is the full coverage area of a dome theater screen.

Equirectangular2Domemaster180 Node

Note: An angular fisheye image with a quoted 180° FOV value can be thought of as a diagonal 180° field of view value in the panoramic image frame. If this image was later converted back into an equirectangular image it would fully cover a 360°x90° image area.

Equirectangular2Domemaster220

Equirectangular2Domemaster220 GUI

This macro will take a 360°x180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama and convert it into a 220° angular fisheye image that has a circular appearance.

This conversion will use the upward (zenith) facing part of the equirectangular image and make that the center part of the domemaster 220° image output.

Equirectangular2Domemaster220 Macro

A typical domemaster image in a planetarium covers a 180° image area which is the full coverage area of a dome theater screen. This Equirectangular2InverseDomemaster220 node compresses a slightly wider 220° field of view output into the same domemaster frame which is useful for squeezing a bit more of the foreground part of the scene into the frame. This extra field of view compression effect is something of a cheat but it looks fine on a dome screen and can compositionally help you fit content below the standard horizon line into the frame which is good for live action type imagery.

Equirectangular2Domemaster220 Node

Note: An angular fisheye image with a quoted 220° FOV value can be thought of as a diagonal 220° field of view value in the panoramic image frame. If this image was later converted back into an equirectangular image it would fully cover a 360°x110° image area.

Equirectangular2InverseAngular

Equirectangular2InverseAngular GUI

This macro will take a 360°x180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama and convert it into a 360° angular fisheye image that has a circular appearance.

The "Inverse" part of this conversion means that it will use the downward (nadir) facing part of the equirectangular image and make that the center part of the angular fisheye 360° image output.

Equirectangular2InverseAngular Macro

Equirectangular2InverseAngular Node

Note: An angular fisheye image with a quoted 360° FOV value can be thought of as a diagonal 360° field of view value in the panoramic image frame. If this image was later converted back into an equirectangular image it would fully cover a 360°x180° image area.

Equirectangular2InverseDomemaster180

Equirectangular2InverseDomemaster180 GUI

This macro will take a 360°x180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama and convert it into a 180° angular fisheye image that has a circular appearance.

The "Inverse" part of this conversion means that it will use the downward (nadir) facing part of the equirectangular image and make that the center part of the domemaster 180° image output.

Equirectangular2InverseDomemaster180 Macro

A typical domemaster image in a planetarium covers a 180° image area which is the full coverage area of a dome theater screen.

Equirectangular2InverseDomemaster180 Node

Note: An angular fisheye image with a quoted 180° FOV value can be thought of as a diagonal 180° field of view value in the panoramic image frame. If this image was later converted back into an equirectangular image it would fully cover a 360°x90° image area.

Equirectangular2InverseDomemaster220

Equirectangular2InverseDomemaster220 GUI

This macro will take a 360°x180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama and convert it into a 220° angular fisheye image that has a circular appearance.

The "Inverse" part of this conversion means that it will use the downward (nadir) facing part of the equirectangular image and make that the center part of the domemaster 220° image output.

Equirectangular2InverseDomemaster220 Macro

A typical domemaster image in a planetarium covers a 180° image area which is the full coverage area of a dome theater screen. This Equirectangular2InverseDomemaster220 node compresses a slightly wider 220° field of view output into the same domemaster frame which is useful for squeezing a bit more of the foreground part of the scene into the frame. This extra field of view compression effect is something of a cheat but it looks fine on a dome screen and can compositionally help you fit content below the standard horizon line into the frame which is good for live action type imagery.

Equirectangular2InverseDomemaster220 Node

Note: An angular fisheye image with a quoted 220° FOV value can be thought of as a diagonal 220° field of view value in the panoramic image frame. If this image was later converted back into an equirectangular image it would fully cover a 360°x110° image area.

Equirectangular2MeshUV

Equirectangular2MeshUV GUI

This node allows you to reformat panoramic imagery from the equirectangular fisheye projection to an arbitrary image projection of your own design that is defined using an FBX/OBJ/DAE/3DS/Alembic format polygon mesh and a custom UV Layout.

The new MeshUV macros are able to support HDRI high dynamic range 16-bit and 32-bit per channel color depth based panoramic image conversions which are essential when dealing with 360° media that will be used as source imagery for an IBL (image based lighting) workflow.

The following image shows the result of an equirectangular image (on the left) being converted into the new Facebook pyramid image projection format (on the right) using the Equirectangular2MeshUV macro node with sample OBJ mesh file Macros:/Domemaster Fusion Macros/Images/facebook_pyramid.obj loaded in the macro node's "FBX File" text field.

Equirectangular2MeshUV

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the 360° angular fisheye imagery that is loaded into the node.

The "FBX File" text field and file browser button allows you to select an OBJ/FBX/DAE/3DS/Alembic based polygon mesh file from your hard disk.

The "Render Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the final rendered Mesh UV output.

The "Render Width" control is used to specify the horizontal resolution of the final rendered Mesh UV output.

The "Cull Front Face" and "Cull Back Face" checkboxes allow you to hide hidden parts of a mesh if you have overlapping regions or reversed faces/normals on the Mesh UV based geometry that is loaded in the FBX File section of the node.

The "UV Gutter Size" control allows you to extend the edge texture map color beyond the border zone region of each of the texture baked polygon mesh based UV Layout regions.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The X Offset/Y Offset/Z Offset sliders allow you to translate the model around the virtual world inside the Fusion 3D scene prior to performing the texture baking effect.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The "X Rotation", "Y Rotation", and "Z Rotation" values allow you to pan the panoramic footage as it is mapped onto the texture baking mesh geometry.

The "Y Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera rig which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic rendering.

The "X Pivot", "Y Pivot", "Z Pivot" lets you move the rotation and offset (translation) origin point that is used when the base mesh is loaded into the texture baking world.

The "Lock X/Y/Z" checkbox will link together the "Scale" control into a single unified slider. When this slider is un-checked you will have direct control over the Scale X/Scale Y/Scale Z controls which allow for non-proportional scaling.

The Scale control allows you to change the size of the mesh used in the texture baking operation. If the model is extremely large or small it can be helpful to change the scale setting control so the model fits within Fusion's default near and far clipping plane regions.

If you disable the "Lock X/Y/Z" checkbox you can create cartoon like squash and stretch distortions in the environment map imagery by doubling the Scale value on a single axis in relation to the other scale controls.

The node has one input which is labelled "Image". The node has a single output called "Output".

Equirectangular2MeshUV Node

Note: If the environment map to Mesh UV texture baking operation doesn't seem to have the correct "infinite" like look to the conversion it is usually an indication the scale control needs to be adjusted to fix the issue.

EquirectangularRenderer3D

EquirectangularRenderer3D GUI

The EquirectangularRenderer3D macro creates a monoscopic "2D" panoramic camera rig that renders out an Equirectangular/LatLong/spherical 360°x180° view and works with Fusion's native 3D animation system. You can wire this macro node into your Shape3D nodes and then can generate Equirectangular animations from your 3D compositing environment.

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the rendered Equirectangular view. The width is set automatically to twice the value of the height setting due to the fact an equirectangular panorama has a 2:1 aspect ratio.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

You have the option of enabling several different render channels. The default option is RGBA which gives you a standard color image output from the EquirectangularRenderer3D node.

The Enable Lighting and Enable Shadows options are useful for creating photorealistic renderings from Fusion's 3D animation system.

The X Offset/Y Offset/Z Offset sliders allow you to translate the camera rig around the virtual world inside the Fusion 3D scene.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the domemaster camera view around and can be used to level the horizon or compensate for dome tilt.

The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera rig which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic rendering.

To use this node, the Fusion 3D scene's output is connected to the node's yellow colored "SceneInput1" attribute. There is one rendered image output from the node called "Output".

This example shows how you might route elements from the Fusion 3D system into the DomemasterRenderer3D node.

EquirectangularRenderer3D Node

EquirectangularRenderer3DAdvanced

EquirectangularRenderer3DAdvanced GUI

The EquirectangularRenderer3DAdvanced macro creates a monoscopic "2D" panoramic camera rig that renders out an Equirectangular/LatLong/spherical 360°x180° view and works with Fusion's native 3D animation system. You can wire this macro node into your Shape3D nodes and then can generate Equirectangular animations from your 3D compositing environment.

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the rendered Equirectangular view. The width is set automatically to twice the value of the height setting due to the fact an equirectangular panorama has a 2:1 aspect ratio.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

You have the option of enabling several different render channels. The default option is RGBA which gives you a standard color image output from the EquirectangularRenderer3D node.

The Z channel gives you a z-depth pass from the scene. The other attributes like Coverage, BGColor, TexCoord0, ObjectID, MaterialID, WorldCoord are not as commonly used.

The Enable Lighting and Enable Shadows options are useful for creating photorealistic renderings from Fusion's 3D animation system.

The X Offset/Y Offset/Z Offset sliders allow you to translate the camera rig around the virtual world inside the Fusion 3D scene.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the domemaster camera view around and can be used to level the horizon or compensate for dome tilt.

The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera rig which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic rendering.

To use this node, the Fusion 3D scene's output is connected to the node's yellow colored "SceneInput1" attribute. There is one rendered image output from the node called "Output".

This example shows how you might route elements from the Fusion 3D system into the EquirectangularRenderer3DAdvanced node.

EquirectangularRenderer3DAdvanced Node

You might have to enable the viewer window's normalize icon (that looks a bit like two gradient bars) to be able to properly view channels like WorldCoord (Positions) or the Z channel (Depth).

The ChannelBoolean node can be used to extract one of these additional channels from the rendered image.

EquirectangularStereo2GearVRStereo

EquirectangularStereo2GearVRStereo GUI

This macro takes the left and right eye views from a pair of stereoscopic 360°x180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panoramas and converts them into a single Gear VR cubic format stereo panoramic image with a 12:1 aspect ratio.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

EquirectangularStereo2GearVRStereo Macro

A Gear VR stereo panorama has a side by side stereo format that has the right camera views placed first then the left camera views placed second. The right (R) and left (L) camera cubic faces are oriented in the following order:

R-Left R-Right R-Top (Rotated 180°) R-Bottom (Rotated 180°) R-Back R-Front L-Left L-Right L-Top (Rotated 180°) L-Bottom (Rotated 180°) L-Back L-Front

The node has a set of "Left" and "Right" inputs that take equirectangular 360°x180° images, and the merged Gear VR cubic stereo output from the node is called "Output".

EquirectangularStereo2GearVRStereo Node

FacebookCubemap3x22CubicFaces

FacebookCubemap3x22CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a Facebook Cubemap 3x2 panoramic format image with a 3:2 aspect ratio and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

FacebookCubemap3x22CubicFaces Macro

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

A Facebook Cubemap 3x2 panorama has the faces oriented in the following order:

Right Left Top
Bottom Front Back

To use this node, the cubemap 3x2 source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

FacebookCubemap3x22CubicFaces Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

FacebookVerticalStrip2Equirectangular

FacebookVerticalStrip2Equirectangular GUI

This macro takes a Facebook Vertical Strip panoramic format image with a 1:6 aspect ratio and converts it into an equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama with a 360° x 180° FOV with an aspect ratio of 2:1.

FacebookVerticalStrip2Equirectangular Macro

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the equirectangular image. The final width for the panoramic image conversion will be twice the height value due to the fact LatLong panoramas have a natural 2:1 aspect ratio.

A Facebook Vertical Strip panorama has all of the images flipped horizontally and the faces are oriented in the following order:

right
left
top (Rotated 180°)
bottom (Rotated 180°)
back
front

To use this node, the Facebook Vertical Strip source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There is a single image output from the node called output.

FacebookVerticalStrip2Equirectangular Node

FacebookVerticalStrip2CubicFaces

FacebookVerticalStrip2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a Facebook Vertical Strip panoramic format image with a 1:6 aspect ratio and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

FacebookVerticalStrip2CubicFaces Macro

The resolution of the input imagery is used to automatically specify the width and height of the extracted cubic views.

A Facebook Vertical Strip panorama has all of the images flipped horizontally and the faces are oriented in the following order:

right
left
top (Rotated 180°)
bottom (Rotated 180°)
back
front

To use this node, the Facebook Vertical Strip source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

FacebookVerticalStrip2CubicFaces Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

Fisheye2Equirectangular

Fisheye2Equirectangular GUI

This macro converts a fisheye image with an arbitrary FOV (field of view) value into an equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama with a 360° x 180° FOV with an aspect ratio of 2:1. With this node you can rotate the fisheye imagery into place in the final equirectangular frame layout.

The Fisheye2Equirectangular node is very useful in a panoramic 360° image and video stitching workflow. This stitching workflow is typically done by taking the output from a Fisheye2Equirectangular node and connecting it to a merge node with a custom B-Spline mask blend each layer of the source camera views into a seamless equirectangular 360° panoramic result.

Fisheye2Equirectangular Macro

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the imagery. The final width for the panoramic image conversion will be twice the Height value due to the fact LatLong panoramas have a natural 2:1 aspect ratio.

This means a fisheye image with a 2048x2048 resolution will be converted into a 4096x2048 resolution LatLong image.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The "Rotation Order" control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon in an image or reposition the final frame layout.

The "Background Color" control allows you to specify what should be placed in the blank area outside the image data when the fisheye image is remapped into an equirectangular panoramic projection.

By default the "A" alpha channel slider is set to 0.0 which means the background is transparent. You can add a custom color to the background region in the equirectangular frame by setting the alpha channel to 1.0 to make the background solid and then you can change the Red/Green/Blue color sliders.

Fisheye2Equirectangular Node

To use this node, the fisheye source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. The image output from the node is called "Output".

This conversion is done with the help of the polar to rectangular coordinates filter.

FisheyeMask

FisheyeMask GUI

The FisheyeMask macro generates a circular alpha channel mask element that is useful for cutting out the border around a domemaster or angular fisheye image and making that area transparent.

FisheyeMask Macro

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the FisheyeMask node output. The final width for the mask will be the Height value due to the fact angular fisheye images have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

The output from the FisheyeMask node is called "Mask". The FisheyeMask node's output is typically connected to an image node's "Effect Mask" input.

FisheyeMask Node

FisheyeStereo2EquirectangularStereo

FisheyeStereo2EquirectangularStereo GUI

This macro converts a pair of stereoscopic 3D fisheye images with an arbitrary FOV (field of view) value into an equirectangular/LatLong/spherical stereo panorama with a 360° x 180° FOV with an aspect ratio of 2:1. With this node you can rotate the left and right stereo fisheye images into place in the final equirectangular frame layout.

The FisheyeStereo2EquirectangularStereo node is very useful in a panoramic 360° image and video stitching workflow. This stitching workflow is typically done by taking the output from a FisheyeStereo2EquirectangularStereo node and connecting it to a merge node with a custom B-Spline mask blend each layer of the source camera views into a seamless equirectangular 360° panoramic result.

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the imagery. The final width for the panoramic image conversion will be twice the Height value due to the fact LatLong panoramas have a natural 2:1 aspect ratio.

This means a fisheye image with a 2048x2048 resolution will be converted into a 4096x2048 resolution LatLong image.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The "Rotation Order" control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon in an image or reposition the final frame layout.

The "Background Color" control allows you to specify what should be placed in the blank area outside the image data when the fisheye image is remapped into an equirectangular panoramic projection.

By default the "A" alpha channel slider is set to 0.0 which means the background is transparent. You can add a custom color to the background region in the equirectangular frame by setting the alpha channel to 1.0 to make the background solid and then you can change the Red/Green/Blue color sliders.

FisheyeStereo2EquirectangularStereo Node

To use this node, the stereo fisheye source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "LeftInput" and "RightInput" attributes. The left and right equirectangular image outputs from the node are called "Left" and "Right".

This conversion is done with the help of the polar to rectangular coordinates filter.

GearVRMono2CubicFaces

GearVRMono2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a single Gear VR mono cubic panorama with a 6:1 aspect ratio and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

A Gear VR mono panorama has the faces oriented in the following order:

Left Right Top (Rotated 180°) Bottom (Rotated 180°) Back Front

To use this node, the Gear VR mono source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

GearVRStereo2CubicFaces

GearVRStereo2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a single Gear VR stereo cubic panorama with a 12:1 aspect ratio and extracts each of the right eye and left eye's six cubic 90° FOV camera views into separate image outputs.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

A Gear VR stereo panorama has a side by side stereo format that has the right camera views placed first then the left camera views placed second. The right (R) and left (L) camera cubic faces are oriented in the following order:

R-Left R-Right R-Top (Rotated 180°) R-Bottom (Rotated 180°) R-Back R-Front L-Left L-Right L-Top (Rotated 180°) L-Bottom (Rotated 180°) L-Back L-Front

To use this node, the Gear VR Stereo source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

GearVRMono2Equirectangular

GearVRMono2Equirectangular GUI

This macro takes a monoscopic Gear VR/Octane Render/Vray horizontal strip cubic panorama with a 6:1 aspect ratio and converts it into an equirectangular view.

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the equirectangular view. The final width for the equirectangular image will be the twice the Height value due to the fact equirectangular views represents a 360°x180° FOV and have a natural 2:1 aspect ratio.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

A Gear VR mono panorama has a side by side stereo format that has the right camera views placed first then the left camera views placed second. The right (R) and left (L) camera cubic faces are oriented in the following order:

A Gear VR mono panorama has the faces oriented in the following order:

Left Right Top (Rotated 180°) Bottom (Rotated 180°) Back Front

GearVRMono2Equirectangular

To use this node, a Gear VR Mono source image is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There is one equirectangular image output from the node called Image.

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

GearVRStereo2EquirectangularStereo

GearVRStereo2EquirectangularStereo GUI

This macro takes a stereo Gear VR/Octane Render/Vray horizontal strip cubic panorama with a 12:1 aspect ratio and converts it into a pair of left eye and right eye equirectangular stereo camera views with separate image outputs.

GearVRStereo2EquirectangularStereo

The "Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the equirectangular views. The final width for the equirectangular image will be the twice the Height value due to the fact equirectangular views represents a 360°x180° FOV and have a natural 2:1 aspect ratio.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

A Gear VR stereo panorama has a side by side stereo format that has the right camera views placed first then the left camera views placed second. The right (R) and left (L) camera cubic faces are oriented in the following order:

R-Left R-Right R-Top (Rotated 180°) R-Bottom (Rotated 180°) R-Back R-Front L-Left L-Right L-Top (Rotated 180°) L-Bottom (Rotated 180°) L-Back L-Front

To use this node, a Gear VR Stereo source image is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are two equirectangular image outputs from the node called Left, and Right.

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

GearVRStereo2EquirectangularStereo Node

GlowPanoramicWrap

GlowPanoramicWrap GUI

The GlowPanoramicWrap node applies a soft glowing effect that is panoramic 360° aware and wraps around the left/right frame border edges to avoid a visual seam artifact that would happen if you used Fusion's built in glow node.

GlowPanoramicWrap

The GlowPanoramicWrap node is perfect if you are creating panoramic 360° CG renderings and are trying to simulate bright light sources with halos. This node can help you render your image correctly where the glow needs to be emanating from the incandescent surface and fully wrap around the frame edge like the image below illustrates:

GlowPanoramicWrap Light Source

The Red/Green/Blue/Alpha checkbox controls allow you to toggle the output of the glow filter effect per channel in the image.

The "Lock X/Y" checkbox allows you to choose if you want the Glow Size control to be uniform on the X and Y axis. If you disable the the "Lock X/Y" checkbox then you can individually adjust the Glow Size with a pair of "X Glow Size" and "Y Glow Size" controls.

The "Glow Size" control allows you to change the radius of the glowing effect.

The "Glow" control is the overall intensity of the glowing light that is overlaid on the image.

The "Blend" control allows you to mix a percentage of the original image back into the glow effect rendered image.

The "Apply Mode" control lets you choose the way the glow effect is composited with the orignal imagery.

The "Red Scale", "Green Scale", Blue Scale", and "Alpha Scale" sliders let you tune the overall intensity of the glowing effect for each individual image channel in the rendered output.

The gradient controls at the bottom of the node parameters in the GUI along with the gradient "line" placement control in the viewer window allow you to sculpt the fade-off of the glow effect. This can be used to good effect to make the pole regions clearer and less glowy in an equirectangular image. The Red channel in the gradient control drives the effect with 0 equalling no glow, and 1 equalling a full strength glow.

You can also use the effect mask control input to add your own vector mask or greyscale map to control where the glow effect is applied.

GlowPanoramicWrap Node

HorizontalCross2CubicFaces

HorizontalCross2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a horizontal cross panoramic image with a 4:3 aspect ratio and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

HorizontalCross2CubicFaces Macro

The horizontal cross faces are located in the format:

Blank Top Blank Blank
Left Front Right Back
Blank Bottom Blank Blank

HorizontalCross2CubicFaces Node

To use this node, the horizontal cross source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

HorizontalStrip2CubicFaces

HorizontalStrip2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a horizontal strip panoramic image with a 6:1 aspect ratio and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

HorizontalStrip2CubicFaces Macro

The horizontal strip faces are located in the format:

Front Right Back Left Top Bottom

To use this node, the source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

HorizontalStrip2CubicFaces Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

HorizontalTee2CubicFaces

HorizontalTee2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a horizontal tee panoramic image with a 4:3 aspect ratio and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

HorizontalTee2CubicFaces Macro

The horizontal tee faces are located in the format:

Top Blank Blank Blank
Front Right Back Left
Bottom Blank Blank Blank

HorizontalTee2CubicFaces Node

To use this node, the source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

MayaBackgroundGradient

MayaBackgroundGradient GUI

The MayaBackgroundGradient macro generates a rectangular frame with a version of the Maya style viewport gradient effect.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

MayaBackgroundGradient Macro

This example shows how you might route the MayaBackgroundGradient node as a background layer to a merge node in a comp. Typically, either 3D rendered content or a character generator like Text+ would be wired in for the foreground imagery.

MayaBackgroundGradient Node

MayaBackgroundGradientCubicFaces

MayaBackgroundGradientCubicFaces GUI

The MayaBackgroundGradientCubicFaces macro generates a set of six 90° FOV cubic faces with a panoramic version of the Maya style viewport gradient effect.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The following image shows result of sending the panoramic cubic output from the MayaBackgroundGradientCubicFaces macro into a CubicFaces2VerticalCross node:

MayaBackgroundGradientCubicFaces Macro

There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

MayaBackgroundGradientCubicFaces Node

MayaBackgroundGradientEquirectangular

MayaBackgroundGradientEquirectangular GUI

The MayaBackgroundGradientEquirectangular macro generates an equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panoramic version of the Maya style viewport gradient effect.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

MayaBackgroundGradientEquirectangular Macro

This example shows how you might route the MayaBackgroundGradientEquirectangular node as a background layer to a merge node in a comp. Typically, either 3D rendered content or a character generator like Text+ would be wired in for the foreground imagery.

MayaBackgroundGradientEquirectangular Node

MRCube1HorizontalStrip2CubicFaces

MRCube1HorizontalStrip2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a mental ray cube1 format horizontal strip panoramic image with a 6:1 aspect ratio and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

MRCube1HorizontalStrip2CubicFaces Macro

The mental ray mib_lookup_cube1 horizontal strip faces are located in the format:

Left Right Bottom Top (Flipped Vertically) Back Front

MRCube1HorizontalStrip2CubicFaces Node

To use this node, the source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

Offset

Offset GUI

This macro is useful for preparing seamless tiling textures by allowing you to scroll the content of an image horizontally or vertically and the scrolled image content wraps around the edge of the image border.

The Offset node has two controls named "X" and "Y" that can be adjusted in the 0-1 range to pan the imagery. Having the Offset attributes set to X 0.5, and Y 0.5 will keep the image unmodified and centered. Setting the Offset X attribute to a value less than 0.5 will pan the image to the left, and a value above 0.5 will pan the image to the right.

The Offset X attribute is helpful for panning a LatLong/Equirectangular image horizontally and can be used to re-center the "front" looking part of a panoramic 360° image without degrading the image quality.

Offset Macro

To use this node, the source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. The image output from the node is called "Output".

Offset Node

Undoing the Offset Effect

If you use an offset node in your comp to re-center a LatLong panorama by scrolling the image horizontally, you can use a 2nd offset node and an expression to revert the footage back its original position with the help of the following workflow:

Offset Motion Inverted Nodes

The original offset node at the beginning of the comp is used to re-center footage. This is useful for doing rotoscoping that might cross the edge boundary of the LatLong/equirectangular/spherical frame.

You can then apply any of your standard compositing operations to effect the imagery.

Finally to revert the footage back to it's original horizontal position you can add a 2nd offset node at the end of the comp. In the node screenshot for this example the final Offset node was renamed in the comp to "OffsetMotionInverted" to help clarify what it does.

To add the expression to the final offset node we need to open up the tool settings. Then right click Offset X & Y attributes for the node and in the pop up contextual menu select "Expression". This will add a text field where you can paste in your expression.

Assuming the first offset node was named "Offset" you can add the following expression Point(1, 0.0)-Offset.Input1 that will undo the horizontal panning effect and your media will take on its original orientation.

Offset Motion Inverted

This type of expression is handy if you keyframe animated the panning offset effect on the first node as the expression will calculate the correct panning value for each frame of your sequence.

Bonus Tip: If you are using a UVPassFromRGBImage node to pan a LatLong image horizontally, you can use the following offset node expression Point(1-UVPassFromRGBImage.Input3, 0.5) to match the UV Pass node's U Offset scrolling rate.

RotateCubicFaces

RotateCubicFaces GUI

This macro allows you to rotate a set of six independent cubemap faces and then get the six transformed cubic faces back as separate outputs. This is useful for levelling horizons or adjusting the front facing view of a panorama.

RotateCubicFaces Macro

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the rendered domemaster view.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon. The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera view which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic image.

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored triangle shaped inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a set of similarly named outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

This example shows a sample node layout where a set of six images are loaded into the RotateCubicFaces macro. The individual cubic views are then rotated, and finally a CubicFaces2HorizontalCross node is used to combine the images into a horizontal cross panorama.

RotateCubicFaces Node

Note: The "RotateCubicFaces" node was previously called "CubicFaces2RotatedCubicFaces".

RotateEquirectangular

RotateEquirectangular GUI

This macro allows you to rotate an equirectangular/LatLong/spherical image. This is useful for levelling horizons or adjusting the front facing view of a panorama.

You could also use the RotateEquirectangular node as a panoramic image roll stabilizer by using animation keys on the rotation controls or a linked expression to perform a panoramic 360° roll correction on the XYZ rotation channels over the duration of an image sequence/video clip.

RotateEquirectangular Macro

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon. The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera view which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic image.

This example shows a sample node layout where a LatLong image is loaded into the RotateEquirectangular macro. The view is then rotated and tilted.

RotateEquirectangular Node

Note: The "RotateEquirectangular" node was previously called "Equirectangular2RotatedEquirectangular".

Note: The Domemaster Fusion Macros v2.2 release fixed a texture texture sampling issue on the left/right image border of the Equirectangular2RotatedEquirectangular node by switching the filtering from trilinear to bilinear sampling.

RotateGearVRMono

RotateGearVRMono GUI

This macro allows you to rotate a single combined image with a Gear VR/Octane ORBX/Vray 6:1 cubic face arrangement. This is useful for levelling horizons or adjusting the front facing view of a panorama.

RotateGearVRMono

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon. The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera view which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic image.

A Gear VR mono panorama has the faces oriented in the following order:

Left Right Top (Rotated 180°) Bottom (Rotated 180°) Back Front

To use this node a Gear VR mono 6:1 monoscopic cubemap image is connect to the node's colored input named "Image". There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which displays the final rotated Gear VR mono cubemap frame.

RotateGearVRMono Node

RotateGearVRStereo

RotateGearVRStereo GUI

This macro allows you to rotate a single combined stereos image with a Gear VR/Octane ORBX/Vray 12:1 horizontal strip cubic face arrangement. This is useful for levelling horizons or adjusting the front facing view of a panorama.

RotateGearVRStereo

The Rotation Order control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon. The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera view which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic image.

A Gear VR stereo panorama has a side by side stereo format that has the right camera views placed first then the left camera views placed second. The right (R) and left (L) camera cubic faces are oriented in the following order:

R-Left R-Right R-Top (Rotated 180°) R-Bottom (Rotated 180°) R-Back R-Front L-Left L-Right L-Top (Rotated 180°) L-Bottom (Rotated 180°) L-Back L-Front

To use this node a Gear VR stereo 12:1 stereoscopic cubemap image is connect to the node's colored input named "Image". There is a single image output from the node called "Output" which displays the final rotated Gear VR stereo cubemap frame.

RotateGearVRStereo Node

SharpenPanoramicWrap

SharpenPanoramicWrap GUI

The SharpenPanoramicWrap node applies a sharpening effect that is panoramic 360° aware and wraps around the left/right frame border edges to avoid a visual seam artifact that would happen if you used Fusion's built in sharpen node.

(As a tip, the UnSharpenMaskPanoramicWrap node is also a nice node to use to improve the overall crispness of an image too and can be a little more nuanced in it's sharpening effect.)

This image has the sharpening effect cranked up really high so the effect is easily visible but harsh. The SharpenPanoramicWrap node should be used subtly for a gentle improvement of clarity.

SharpenPanoramicWrap

The Red/Green/Blue/Alpha checkbox controls allow you to toggle the output of the sharpen filter effect per channel in the image.

The "Lock X/Y" checkbox allows you to choose if you want the Amount control to be uniform on the X and Y axis. If you disable the the "Lock X/Y" checkbox then you can individually adjust the Amount with a pair of "X Amount" and "Y Amount" controls.

The "Blend" control allows you to mix a percentage of the original image back into the sharpen effect rendered image.

The gradient controls at the bottom of the node parameters in the GUI along with the gradient "line" placement control in the viewer window allow you to sculpt the fade-off of the sharpen effect. This can be used to good effect to make the pole regions clearer and less sharpened in an equirectangular image. The Red channel in the gradient control drives the effect with 0 equalling no sharpening, and 1 equalling a full strength sharpen.

You can also use the effect mask control input to add your own vector mask or greyscale map to control where the sharpen effect is applied.

SharpenPanoramicWrap Node

StereoAnaglyphHalfColorMerge

StereoAnaglyphHalfColorMerge GUI

The StereoAnaglyphHalfColorMerge node is used to create an anaglyph red/cyan 3D glasses style stereo image by merging a pair of left and right images.

The Saturation control allows you do create an anaglyph image with either full strength colors (with the saturation at 1.0), a fully black and white anaglyph image (with the saturation at 0.0), or a 50% saturated image (with the saturation at 0.5).

Reducing the saturation of an anaglyph stereo image to 50% or less is sometimes helpful for reducing the visibility of distracting "retinal rivalry" color artifacts. This is evident when the source images have objects with a super pure red, green, or blue color shading that would only normally show up in either the left or right eye view in the anaglyph color filters and look very dark in the opposite eye's view of the stereo scene.

The Convergence controls named "X" and "Y" can be adjusted in the 0-1 range to pan the imagery. The Convergence X control is useful for scrolling the image horizontally which has the effect of changing the zero parallax zone in a LatLong 360° panoramic stereo image. Having the convergence attributes set to X 0.5, and Y 0.5 will keep the image unmodified and centered. Setting the convergence X attribute to a value less than 0.5 will pan the image to the left, and a value above 0.5 will pan the image to the right.

The Size control allows you to scale the right stereo view to better line up with the left eye imagery.

The Angle control rotates the right eye imagery around the image's center point.

The Edges control allows you to control how the imagery is handled if it is rotated using the angle setting, or scrolled using the convergence setting outside of the image frame border zone. If the Edge control is set to "Canvas" the imagery is cropped on the frame edge. If the Edge control is set to "Wrap" then the image data that exits the frame border using the convergence control and the angle control will loop around to the other size of the image.

This is a node view of merging a left and right pair of stereo images into the anaglyph stereo format:

StereoAnaglyphHalfColorMerge Node

Note: If you are doing VR content creation on a tight budget without access to an HMD like an Oculus Rift, you can merge your left and right camera view stereoscopic LatLong 360° images into the anaglyph format.

Send to PanoView

Then you would send the imagery to a panoramic 360° media viewer tool using the Domemaster Fusion Macro's bundled PanoView script (using the Script > PanoView menu item to launch the tool). With an affordable pair of red/cyan anaglyph 3D glasses on, you can pan the 360° view with your mouse and still get a rough idea of the stereo effect without breaking the bank.

StereoAnaglyphMerge

StereoAnaglyphMerge GUI

The StereoAnaglyphMerge node is used to create an anaglyph red/cyan 3D glasses style stereo image by merging a pair of left and right images. This node can be used easily with regular stereo images or panoramic stereo images.

The Convergence controls named "X" and "Y" can be adjusted in the 0-1 range to pan the imagery. The Convergence X control is useful for scrolling the image horizontally which has the effect of changing the zero parallax zone in a LatLong 360° panoramic stereo image. Having the convergence attributes set to X 0.5, and Y 0.5 will keep the image unmodified and centered. Setting the convergence X attribute to a value less than 0.5 will pan the image to the left, and a value above 0.5 will pan the image to the right.

The Size control allows you to scale the right stereo view to better line up with the left eye imagery.

The Angle control rotates the right eye imagery around the image's center point.

The Edges control allows you to control how the imagery is handled if it is rotated using the angle setting, or scrolled using the convergence setting outside of the image frame border zone. If the Edge control is set to "Canvas" the imagery is cropped on the frame edge. If the Edge control is set to "Wrap" then the image data that exits the frame border using the convergence control and the angle control will loop around to the other size of the image.

This is a node view of merging a left and right pair of stereo images into the anaglyph stereo format:

StereoAnaglyphMerge Node

Note: If you are doing VR content creation on a tight budget without access to an HMD like an Oculus Rift, you can merge your left and right camera view stereoscopic LatLong 360° images into the anaglyph format.

Send to PanoView

Then you would send the imagery to a panoramic 360° media viewer tool using the Domemaster Fusion Macro's bundled PanoView script (using the Script > PanoView menu item to launch the tool). With an affordable pair of red/cyan anaglyph 3D glasses on, you can pan the 360° view with your mouse and still get a rough idea of the stereo effect without breaking the bank.

StereoOverUnderExtract

StereoOverUnderExtract GUI

The StereoOverUnderExtract macro will separate a merged set of left and right stereo images from the Over/Under stereo format where the left image is placed on the top, and the right image is placed on the bottom part of the frame.

This is a node view of extracting a left and right pair of stereo images from a single picture in the "Over Under" stereo format:

StereoOverUnderExtract Node

StereoOverUnderMerge

StereoOverUnderMerge GUI

The StereoOverUnderMerge macro will take a pair of separate left and right stereo images and place them into a single image frame. The left image is placed on top, and the right image is placed on the bottom part of the frame.

This is a node view of merging a left and right pair of stereo images into the "Over Under" stereo format:

StereoOverUnderMerge Node

StereoSideBySideExtract

StereoSideBySideExtract GUI

The StereoSideBySideExtract macro will separate a merged set of left and right stereo images from the Side by Side stereo format where the left image is placed on the left side, and the right image is placed on the right side of the frame.

This is a node view of extracting a left and right pair of stereo images from a single picture in the "Side by Side" stereo format:

StereoSideBySideExtract Node

StereoSideBySideMerge

StereoSideBySideMerge GUI

The StereoSideBySideMerge macro will take a pair of separate left and right stereo images and place them into a single image frame. The left image is placed on the left side, and the right image is placed on the right side of the frame.

This is a node view of merging a left and right pair of stereo images into the "Side by Side" stereo format:

StereoSideBySideMerge Node

UnSharpenMaskPanoramicWrap

UnSharpenMaskPanoramicWrap GUI

The UnSharpenMaskPanoramicWrap node applies a sharpening effect that is panoramic 360° aware and wraps around the left/right frame border edges to avoid a visual seam artifact that would happen if you used Fusion's built in un-sharpen mask node.

The UnSharpenMaskPanoramicWrap node should be used subtly for a gentle improvement of clarity.

UnSharpenMaskPanoramicWrap

The Red/Green/Blue/Alpha checkbox controls allow you to toggle the output of the sharpen filter effect per channel in the image.

The "Lock X/Y" checkbox allows you to choose if you want the Size control to be uniform on the X and Y axis. If you disable the the "Lock X/Y" checkbox then you can individually adjust the Size with a pair of "X Size" and "Y Size" controls.

The "Size" control allows you to adjust the overall radius of the un-sharpen mask effect on the image.

The "Gain" controls allow you to fine tune the intensity of the un-sharpen filter.

The "Threshold" control allows you to adjust the equivalent of a cut in point where the un-sharpen filter is active.

The "Blend" control allows you to mix a percentage of the original image back into the sharpen effect rendered image.

The gradient controls at the bottom of the node parameters in the GUI along with the gradient "line" placement control in the viewer window allow you to sculpt the fade-off of the sharpen effect. This can be used to good effect to make the pole regions clearer and less sharpened in an equirectangular image. The Red channel in the gradient control drives the effect with 0 equalling no un-sharpening, and 1 equalling a full strength un-sharpen.

You can also use the effect mask control input to add your own vector mask or greyscale map to control where the un-sharpen filter is applied.

UnSharpenMaskPanoramicWrap Node

UVAngular2EquirectangularGradientMap

The UVAngular2EquirectangularGradientMap macro generates a UV Pass texture that is used with the stock Fusion "Texture" node or the "UVPassFromRGBImage" node to convert panoramic image sequences between the angular fisheye 360° format and the equirectangular/LatLong/spherical 360°x180° image projection.

UVAngular2EquirectangularGradientMap Macro

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the UV Pass image output. It is a good idea to always use the 32bit float option when generating a UV Pass image so you have the maximum color precision possible and can work with remapping a high resolution image.

If you use the 8bit int option when creating a UV Pass image you won't be able to remap an image over 256 pixels in width or height so a high dynamic range 16bit or 32bit output should be used at all times instead.

This is a node view of the typical UVPassFromRGBImage node connections that would be used to convert angular fisheye 360° format imagery to the equirectangular/LatLong/spherical 360°x180° image projection:

UVAngular2EquirectangularGradientMap Node

UVDomemaster2EquirectangularGradientMap

The UVDomemaster2EquirectangularGradientMap macro generates a UV Pass texture that is used with the stock Fusion "Texture" node or the "UVPassFromRGBImage" node to convert panoramic image sequences between the angular fisheye 180° format and the equirectangular/LatLong/spherical 360°x180° image projection.

UVDomemaster2EquirectangularGradientMap Macro

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the UV Pass image output. It is a good idea to always use the 32bit float option when generating a UV Pass image so you have the maximum color precision possible and can work with remapping a high resolution image.

If you use the 8bit int option when creating a UV Pass image you won't be able to remap an image over 256 pixels in width or height so a high dynamic range 16bit or 32bit output should be used at all times instead.

This is a node view of the typical UVPassFromRGBImage node connections that would be used to convert angular fisheye 180° format imagery to the equirectangular/LatLong/spherical 360°x180° image projection:

UVDomemaster2EquirectangularGradientMap Node

UVEquirectangular2AngularGradientMap

UVEquirectangular2AngularGradientMap GUI

The UVEquirectangular2AngularGradientMap macro generates a UV Pass texture that is used with the stock Fusion "Texture" node or the "UVPassFromRGBImage" node to convert panoramic image sequences between the equirectangular/LatLong/spherical 360°x180° format and the angular fisheye 360° image projection.

UVEquirectangular2AngularGradientMap Macro

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the UV Pass image output. It is a good idea to always use the 32bit float option when generating a UV Pass image so you have the maximum color precision possible and can work with remapping a high resolution image.

If you use the 8bit int option when creating a UV Pass image you won't be able to remap an image over 256 pixels in width or height so a high dynamic range 16bit or 32bit output should be used at all times instead.

This is a node view of the typical UVPassFromRGBImage node connections that would be used to convert equirectangular/LatLong/spherical 360°x180° format imagery to the angular fisheye 360° image projection:

UVEquirectangular2AngularGradientMap Node

UVEquirectangular2DomemasterGradientMap

UVEquirectangular2DomemasterGradientMap GUI

The UVEquirectangular2DomemasterGradientMap macro generates a UV Pass texture that is used with the stock Fusion "Texture" node or the "UVPassFromRGBImage" node to convert panoramic image sequences between the equirectangular/LatLong/spherical 360°x180° format and the angular fisheye 180° image projection.

UVEquirectangular2DomemasterGradientMap Macro

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the UV Pass image output. It is a good idea to always use the 32bit float option when generating a UV Pass image so you have the maximum color precision possible and can work with remapping a high resolution image.

If you use the 8bit int option when creating a UV Pass image you won't be able to remap an image over 256 pixels in width or height so a high dynamic range 16bit or 32bit output should be used at all times instead.

This is a node view of the typical UVPassFromRGBImage node connections that would be used to convert equirectangular/LatLong/spherical 360°x180° format imagery to the angular fisheye 180° image projection:

UVEquirectangular2DomemasterGradientMap Node

UVGradientMap

UVGradientMap GUI

This macro creates an image with a simple Red/Green gradient effect that represents the base UV Pass texture map that all UV Pass remapping workflows are based upon. The Red channel represents the horizontal axis, and the green channel represents the vertical axis in a UV Pass.

UVGradientMap Macro

This UV Pass texture is used with the stock Fusion "Texture" node or the "UVPassFromRGBImage" node to remap a panoramic image sequence at a faster rate than just doing the transform math from scratch on each frame. A UV Pass workflow is used to bake the image transform and remapping data into a red/green channel high bit depth image that can speed up rendering by 30% or more since the image data acts like a pre-computed "look up table".

Typically a UVGradientMap texture map would be run through a Fusion node based warping process, or the imagery would be sent into a panoramic stitching tool like PTgui and transformed from its original red/green "flat" horizontal and vertical gradient look into the final pre-computed re-projection which can include lens distortion correction, panoramic rotations and transforms, image scaling, or other effects.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the UV Pass image output. It is a good idea to always use the 32bit float option when generating a UV Pass image so you have the maximum color precision possible and can work with remapping a high resolution image.

The "Flip Horizontally" checkbox will reverse the gradient orientation on the X axis.

The "Flip Vertically" checkbox will reverse the gradient orientation on the Y axis.

The Flip Horizontally checkbox on the UVGradientMap node is handy for flipping the panoramic remapped imagery. This flipping action has the effect of simulating the world as if you are looking at the panoramic environment from either the "inside" or the "outside" and will reverse the imagery when the final imagery is routed through the UVPassFromRGBImage node. This is handy for fixing panoramic imagery that has the text reversed with details like lettering on road signs appearing backwards.

Note: If you use the 8bit int option when creating a UV Pass image, or save the resulting image to an 8bit per channel image format like a PNG/TGA/JPEG you won't be able to remap an image over 256 pixels in width or height. This is why it is so important to render and save a high dynamic range 16bit or 32bit UV Pass gradient image at all times to avoid any resolution limits (or banding artifacts) you would otherwise experience.

UVPassFromRGBImage

UVPassFromRGBImage GUI

This macro works as a replacement for the standard Fusion "Texture" UV Pass remapping node. The UVPassFromRGBImage node simplifies the workflow for remapping a UV Pass image as it is able to pull the UV channel data directly from the RGB channels in the connected image.

By using this updated and improved UVPassFromRGBImage node in place of the older "Texture" node you don't need to add a separate Channel Booleans node to your composite each time you need to swap your RGB and UV pass image channels.

The "Flip Horizontally" checkbox will reverse the gradient orientation on the X axis.

The "Flip Vertically" checkbox will reverse the gradient orientation on the Y axis.

The Flip Horizontally checkbox on the UVGradientMap node is handy for flipping the panoramic remapped imagery from the "inside" to the "outside" and will reverse the imagery when it is routed through the UVPassFromRGBImage node.

The "U Offset" slider is handy for panning a remapped image horizontally and will work correctly across any of the remapped panoramic image projections. The "U Offset" slider works by "scrolling" the UV Pass color values in place which then adjusts the remapped output.

The final resolution of the UV Pass remapped imagery is determined based upon the width and height of the UV Pass input image that is fed into the UVPassFromRGBImage node.

The UVPassFromRGBImage node has two inputs which are labelled "Image", and "UV Pass". The node has a single output called "Output".

UV Pass Equirectangular to Angular Fisheye Remapping

This image shows the result of taking a standard equirectangular panoramic image and running it through the UVPassFromRGBImage macro with the UVEquirectangular2AngularGradientMap node as the UV Pass remapping image:

UVPassFromRGBImage Macro

This is the node layout for the UVPassFromRGBImage macro when an equirectangular 360°x180° image is set as the "Image" input, and the "UVEquirectangular2AngularGradientMap" macro is set as the "UV Pass" input. The result is an angular fisheye 360° based panoramic conversion.

UVPassFromRGBImage Node

UV Pass Equirectangular to Cubemap 3x2 Remapping

This image shows the result of the UV Pass node when it is used to do an equirectangular 360°x180° to cubemap 3x2 image conversion.

UVPassFromRGBImage Macro

This is a Fusion node view screenshot that shows how the UV Pass remapping result was generated:

UVPassFromRGBImage Node

It works by feeding in a stock UVGradientMap node texture image into the Equirectangular2CubicFaces node which remaps the UV Pass texture into separate 90° FOV cubic faces extracted from the UVGradientMap in the equirectangular projection.

Then the separate cubic faces (which hold the UV Pass data) from the Equirectangular2CubicFaces node are re-arranged and merged into a cubemap 3x2 layout using the CubicFaces2Cubemap3x2 macro. This final UV Pass map is fed into the UVPassFromRGBImage macro as the "UV Pass" input.

A panoramic equirectangular 360°x180° panoramic image is then connected to the UVPassFromRGBImage macro's "Image" input.

At this point you might be wondering what the final UV Pass texture map image looks like that was fed into the UVPassFromRGBImage macro for this panoramic conversion.

The original UVGradientMap map is on the left side, and the final equirectangular to cubemap 3x2 conversion UV Pass map texture is on the right side:

UVGradientMap to CubicFaces2Cubemap3x2 Remapping

Quick Recap: The UV Pass map for equirectangular to Cubemap3x2 panoramic conversion was created by connecting the following macro nodes together:

UVGradientMap > Equirectangular2CubicFaces > CubicFaces2Cubemap3x2

Note: To make this whole UV Pass remapping process worthwhile and fast for panoramic image sequence processing, it would be a good idea to save a single frame .exr 32bit per channel image from your generated UV Pass texture map and then re-use it across the whole image sequence for a 30% plus speed boost.

Note: UV Pass images require special care to handle anti-aliasing and filtering on the UV Pass content is sensitive to image filtering in a way that is quite similar to the issues experienced with a traditional a Z-depth channel image.

UVPassFromRGBImageOnDisk

UVPassFromRGBImageOnDisk GUI

This macro works as a replacement for the standard Fusion "Texture" UV Pass remapping node, or the UVPassFromRGBImage node.

An advantage of using the UVPassFromRGBImageOnDisk node is that you don't need to add an image loader node to your composite each time you want to perform a UV Pass warping effect because this node stores the file loading attributes inside of the node. When you first add a UVPassFromRGBImageOnDisk node to your comp a file dialog appears that allows you to select a 16-bit or 32-bit per channel UV pass image from your hard disk.

UVPassFromRGBImageOnDisk Macro

The "UV Pass Image" text field allows you to load a warping image off disk. This image should typically be a high dynamic range 16 bit per channel or 32 bit per channel .tiff or .exr image.

The "Flip Horizontally" checkbox will reverse the gradient orientation on the X axis.

The "Flip Vertically" checkbox will reverse the gradient orientation on the Y axis.

The "U Offset" slider is handy for panning a remapped image horizontally and will work correctly across any of the remapped panoramic image projections. The "U Offset" slider works by "scrolling" the UV Pass color values in place which then adjusts the remapped output.

The "V Offset" slider is handy for panning a remapped image vertically.

The final resolution of the UV Pass remapped imagery is determined based upon the width and height of the UV Pass input image that is used inside of the UVPassFromRGBImageOnDisk node.

The UVPassFromRGBImageOnDisk node has one input which is labelled "Image". The node has a single output called "Output".

UVPassFromRGBImageOnDisk Node

Note: To make this whole UV Pass remapping process worthwhile and fast for panoramic image sequence processing, it would be a good idea to save a single frame .exr 32bit per channel image from your generated UV Pass texture map and then re-use it across the whole image sequence for a 30% plus speed boost.

Note: UV Pass images require special care to handle anti-aliasing and filtering on the UV Pass content is sensitive to image filtering in a way that is quite similar to the issues experienced with a traditional a Z-depth channel image.

UVPassVideoStitchingTemplate

This is a starting template for UV pass based panoramic 360° video stitching. The final stitched panoramic video is written to disk using the saver node on the bottom right of the composite named "PanoramaSaver".

You can duplicate and modify this structure to support stitching any number of panoramic cameras in your video rig. As you modify this node graph, you can connect each panoramic 360° video camera view together in the composite using the merge nodes on the right named "ViewMerge".

To prepare your footage for use with this video stitching template the Domemaster Fusion Macros "Generate UV Pass in PTGui" script should be used to turn your PTGui stitching .pts project file into a set of UV pass based panoramic warping images (ST Maps) that allow you to warp your video into the final panoramic image projection.

The node named "CameraLoader" is used to load in the footage from one of your panoramic video rig cameras. The "UVPassLoader" node is used to load in a matching uv pass warping image for that specific camera view.

The "BSplineMask" node is used along with an "AlphaMaskMerge" node to draw a custom rotoshape to select the part of a camera view you want to keep in the composite.

The "AlphaMaskMerge" node is disabled by default with the Fusion "pass through" mode as it can only be used when you have created an acutal mask shape in the BSplineMask node.

The saver nodes on the right hand side of the composite named "CameraMaskSaver" are used to allow you to export each of the camera view's custom BSpline alpha masks to disk if you want to use them later with an external compositing tool.

The "ColorCorrector" node is used to apply the primary color correction. Then the "ColorCorrectorMasked" node is used with the built-in gradient controls to adjust the masking of the color adjustments that will allow you to fine tune the brightness and color falloff in different regions in the frame like the pole area.

The "ViewerEquirectangular" node is used as a panoramic 360° media viewer tool that simulates the playback of LatLong format media on an flat monitor view.

UVPassVideoStitchingTemplate Node

VerticalCross2CubicFaces

VerticalCross2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a vertical cross panoramic format image with a 3:4 aspect ratio and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

VerticalCross2CubicFaces Macro

The vertical cross faces are located in the format:

Blank Top Blank
Left Front Right
Blank Bottom Blank
Blank Back (Rotated 180°) Blank

To use this node, the vertical strip source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

VerticalCross2CubicFaces Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

VerticalStrip2CubicFaces

VerticalStrip2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a vertical strip panoramic format image with a 1:6 aspect ratio and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

VerticalStrip2CubicFaces Macro

The vertical strip faces are located in the format:

Front
Right
Back
Left
Top
Bottom

To use this node, the vertical strip source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

VerticalStrip2CubicFaces Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

VerticalTee2CubicFaces

VerticalTee2CubicFaces GUI

This macro takes a vertical tee panoramic format image with a 3:4 aspect ratio and extracts a set of six 90° FOV cubic camera views as separate cubic image outputs.

The "Input Height" control is used to specify the vertical resolution of the extracted cubic views. The final width for the cubic images will be the Input Height value due to the fact cubic views represents a 90° FOV and have a natural 1:1 aspect ratio.

VerticalTee2CubicFaces Macro

The vertical tee faces are located in the format:

Left Front Right
Blank BottomBlank
Blank Back (Rotated 180°) Blank
Blank Top Blank

To use this node, the vertical tee source imagery is connected to the node's yellow colored "Input" attribute. There are six image outputs from the node called Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom.

VerticalTee2CubicFaces Macro

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the red color node outputs you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected output is called.

ViewerCubicFaces

ViewerCubic GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images and "defishes" it to extract a normal rectangular image (like a typical 16:9 or 4:3 style video frame) that can be displayed on a regular TV or a monitor.

This is handy as an panoramic 360° image viewer that works in the Fusion node based environment. You can animate the XYZ rotation and field of view settings to explore different parts of the frame as you do the panoramic conversion.

ViewerCubic Macro

The "Width" and "Height" controls are used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the extracted camera view.

The "Pixel Aspect" control can be used to create anamorphic stretching look if you want to go with a non square pixel format.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The "Angle of View Type" control allows you to choose which axis is used on the lens when the Focal Length and Angle of View value is computed.

The "Angle of View" control changes the camera field of view setting in degrees used for the panoramic view extraction. The "Focal Length (mm)" control is linked together with the Angle of View control so you can use either slider and achieve the same field of view result.

The "Film Gate", "Aperture Width", "Aperture Height", and "Lens Shift X" and Y values are used to match your Fusion macro based extracted camera view against a traditional photographic lens based camera parameter.

The "Lens Shift X" and "Lens Shift Y" parameters allow you to adjust the 2D filmback based centering of the lens compared to the origin of a theoretical film back on the camera.

The "Rotation Order" control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon. The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera view which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic image.

If you have a TV or video projector connected in the Fusion preferences as a "Video Monitoring Device", you can view a final extracted 16:9 rectangular video version of your composite on a full screen video display.

Fusion Video Monitoring preferences

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored inputs named Front, Right, Back, Left, Top, and Bottom attributes. There is a single image output from the node called "Output".

The image below shows an example conversion from the composite file Viewer Cubic Faces.comp.

ViewerCubic Node

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the colored triangle inputs on the node you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected input is called.

ViewerCubicFacesStereo

ViewerCubicFacesStereo GUI

This macro takes a set of six individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images for the left and right eye and "defishes" it to extract a stereoscopic rectangular image (like a typical 16:9 or 4:3 style video frame) that can be displayed on a stereo TV or a monitor.

This is handy as an panoramic 360° image viewer that works in the Fusion node based environment. You can animate the XYZ rotation and field of view settings to explore different parts of the frame as you do the panoramic conversion.

The image below shows an example conversion from the composite file Viewer Cubic Faces.comp that has a Gear VR horizontal strip stereo cubemap image (on the left) that is run through the ViewerCubicFacesStereo macro and extracted into a pair of left and right rectangular stereo views. Those two images are then merged into an anagylph stereo output with the help of a StereoAnaglyphHalfColorMerge macro. This kind of approach allows you to quickly and cost effectively preview the stereo imagery on your monitor as you work on building a 360° stereo composite.

ViewerCubicFacesStereo Macro

The "Width" and "Height" controls are used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the extracted camera view.

The "Pixel Aspect" control can be used to create anamorphic stretching look if you want to go with a non square pixel format.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The "Angle of View Type" control allows you to choose which axis is used on the lens when the Focal Length and Angle of View value is computed.

The "Angle of View" control allows you to change the camera field of view setting in degrees used for the panoramic view extraction. The "Focal Length (mm)" control is linked together with the Angle of View control so you can use either slider and achieve the same field of view result.

The "Film Gate", "Aperture Width", "Aperture Height", and "Lens Shift X" and Y values are used to match your Fusion macro based extracted camera view against a traditional photographic lens based camera parameter.

The "Lens Shift X" and "Lens Shift Y" parameters allow you to adjust the 2D filmback based centering of the lens compared to the origin of a theoretical film back on the camera.

The "Rotation Order" control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon. The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera view which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic image.

If you have a stereo 3D capable TV or video projector connected in the Fusion preferences as a "Video Monitoring Device", you can view a final stereo extracted 16:9 rectangular video version of your composite on a true color stereo device with shutter glasses or polarizer lenses.

Fusion Video Monitoring preferences

This is a snapshot of the example composite "Cubic Faces Defish to Rectangular.comp" that shows how to extract a perspective stereo camera view from a Gear VR horizontal strip cubic stereo panorama and convert it into a 16:9 rectangular format.

ViewerCubicFacesStereo Node

To use this node, individual 90° FOV based cubic view source images are connected to the node's colored inputs named LeftCam_Front, LeftCam_Right, LeftCam_Back, LeftCam_Left, LeftCam_Top, LeftCam_Bottom, RightCam_Front, RightCam_Right, RightCam_Back, RightCam_Left, RightCam_Top, and RightCam_Bottom attributes. There are two image outputs from the node called "LetOutput" and "RightOutput" that hold the left and right extracted and defished image views.

Note: If you hover your cursor over each of the colored triangle inputs on the node you will see a tool tip appear that indicates what the currently selected input is called.

ViewerEquirectangular

ViewerEquirectangular GUI

This macro takes a 360° x 180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical panorama and "defishes" it to extract a normal rectangular image (like a typical 16:9 or 4:3 style video frame) that can be displayed on a normal TV or a monitor.

This is handy as an panoramic 360° image viewer that works in the Fusion node based environment. You can animate the XYZ rotation and field of view settings to explore different parts of the frame as you do the panoramic conversion.

ViewerEquirectangular Macro

The "Width" and "Height" controls are used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the extracted camera view.

The "Pixel Aspect" control can be used to create anamorphic stretching look if you want to go with a non square pixel format.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The "Angle of View Type" control allows you to choose which axis is used on the lens when the Focal Length and Angle of View value is computed.

The "Angle of View" control allows you to change the camera field of view setting in degrees used for the panoramic view extraction. The "Focal Length (mm)" control is linked together with the Angle of View control so you can use either slider and achieve the same field of view result.

The "Film Gate", "Aperture Width", "Aperture Height", and "Lens Shift X" and Y values are used to match your Fusion macro based extracted camera view against a traditional photographic lens based camera parameter.

The "Lens Shift X" and "Lens Shift Y" parameters allow you to adjust the 2D filmback based centering of the lens compared to the origin of a theoretical film back on the camera.

The "Rotation Order" control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon. The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera view which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic image.

If you have a TV or video projector connected in the Fusion preferences as a "Video Monitoring Device", you can view a final extracted 16:9 rectangular video version of your composite on a full screen video display.

Fusion Video Monitoring preferences

This is a snapshot of the example composite "LatLong Defish to Rectangular.comp" that shows how to extract a perspective view from a LatLong panorama and convert it into a 16:9 rectangular format.

ViewerEquirectangular Node

ViewerEquirectangularStereo

ViewerEquirectangularStereo GUI

This macro takes a pair of separate left and right eye stereo 360° x 180° equirectangular/LatLong/spherical stereo panoramas and "defishes" them to extract a normal rectangular left and right eye images (like a typical 16:9 or 4:3 style video frame) that can be displayed on a normal TV or a monitor.

This is handy as a panoramic 360° stereo image viewer that works in the Fusion node based environment. You can animate the XYZ rotation and field of view settings to explore different parts of the frame as you do the panoramic conversion.

The left and right image outputs from this node can be routed into an anaglyph merging node like "StereoAnaglyphHalfColorMerge", or the over/under stereoscopic node "StereoOverUnderMerge", or the side by side stereoscopic node "StereoSideBySideMerge" for a quick and interactive stereo preview of your composite.

ViewerEquirectangularStereo Macro

The "Width" and "Height" controls are used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the extracted camera view.

The "Pixel Aspect" control can be used to create anamorphic stretching look if you want to go with a non square pixel format.

The "Depth" control allows you to specify the bit depth for the panoramic output. The "8bit int" option is for PNG/TGA/JPG outputs, and the "16bit float" or "32bit float" options are perfect for floating point EXR based outputs that have HDR (high dynamic range) based color values that exceed the standard 0.0-1.0 color range.

The "Angle of View Type" control allows you to choose which axis is used on the lens when the Focal Length and Angle of View value is computed.

The "Angle of View" control allows you to change the camera field of view setting in degrees used for the panoramic view extraction. The "Focal Length (mm)" control is linked together with the Angle of View control so you can use either slider and achieve the same field of view result.

The "Film Gate", "Aperture Width", "Aperture Height", and "Lens Shift X" and Y values are used to match your Fusion macro based extracted camera view against a traditional photographic lens based camera parameter.

The "Lens Shift X" and "Lens Shift Y" parameters allow you to adjust the 2D filmback based centering of the lens compared to the origin of a theoretical film back on the camera.

The "Rotation Order" control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon. The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera view which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic image.

If you have a stereo 3D capable TV or video projector connected in the Fusion preferences as a "Video Monitoring Device", you can view a final stereo extracted 16:9 rectangular video version of your composite on a true color stereo device with shutter glasses or polarizer lenses.

Fusion Video Monitoring preferences

This is a snapshot of the example composite "LatLong Stereo Defish to Rectangular.comp" that shows how to extract a perspective view from a pair of left and right eye stereo LatLong panoramas and convert them into a 16:9 rectangular anaglyph stereo format.

ViewerEquirectangularStereo Node

ViewerMesh

ViewerMesh GUI

This node allows you to reformat panoramic imagery to an arbitrary image projection of your own design that is defined using an FBX/OBJ/DAE/3DS/Alembic format polygon mesh and a custom UV Layout.

This macro is also handy as a multi-purpose panoramic 360° image viewer that works in the Fusion node based environment. You can animate the XYZ rotation and field of view settings to explore different parts of the frame as you do the panoramic conversion.

The following image shows the result of a fulldome image (on the left) being defished into a regular rectangular image projection format (on the right) using the ViewerMesh macro node with sample mesh file Macros:/Domemaster Fusion Macros/Images/fulldome.fbx loaded in the macro node's "Mesh File" text field.

ViewerMesh Macro

The "Width" and "Height" controls are used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the extracted camera view.

The "Pixel Aspect" control can be used to create anamorphic stretching look if you want to go with a non square pixel format.

The "Angle of View Type" control allows you to choose which axis is used on the lens when the Focal Length and Angle of View value is computed.

The "Angle of View" control allows you to change the camera field of view setting in degrees used for the panoramic view extraction. The "Focal Length (mm)" control is linked together with the Angle of View control so you can use either slider and achieve the same field of view result.

The "Film Gate", "Aperture Width", "Aperture Height", and "Lens Shift X" and Y values are used to match your Fusion macro based extracted camera view against a traditional photographic lens based camera parameter.

The "Lens Shift X" and "Lens Shift Y" parameters allow you to adjust the 2D filmback based centering of the lens compared to the origin of a theoretical film back on the camera.

The "Rotation Order" control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon. The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera view which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic image.

The "Lock X/Y/Z" checkbox will link together the "Scale" control into a single unified slider. When this slider is un-checked you will have direct control over the Scale X/Scale Y/Scale Z controls which allow for non-proportional scaling.

The Scale control allows you to change the size of the mesh used in the texture baking operation. If the model is extremely large or small it can be helpful to change the scale setting control so the model fits within Fusion's default near and far clipping plane regions.

If you disable the "Lock X/Y/Z" checkbox you can create cartoon like squash and stretch distortions in the environment map imagery by doubling the Scale value on a single axis in relation to the other scale controls.

If you have a TV or video projector connected in the Fusion preferences as a "Video Monitoring Device", you can view a final extracted 16:9 rectangular video version of your composite on a full screen video display.

Fusion Video Monitoring preferences

The node has one input which is labelled "Input". The node has a single output called "Output".

ViewerMesh Node

Note: If the ViewerMesh texture baking operation doesn't seem to have the correct "infinite" like look to the panoramic image conversion it is usually an indication the scale control needs to be adjusted to fix the issue.

ViewerMeshStereo

ViewerMeshStereo GUI

This node allows is a stereoscopic version of the standard ViewerMesh node. It allows you to reformat a pair of left and right panoramic images to an arbitrary image projection of your own design that is defined using an FBX/OBJ/DAE/3DS/Alembic format polygon mesh and a custom UV Layout.

This macro is also handy as a multi-purpose panoramic 360° image viewer that works in the Fusion node based environment. You can animate the XYZ rotation and field of view settings to explore different parts of the frame as you do the panoramic conversion.

The "Width" and "Height" controls are used to specify the vertical and horizontal resolution of the extracted camera view.

The "Renderer Type" options menu allows you to choose if you want to use the Fusion Software Renderer or the OpenGL Renderer to drive the panoramic 360° media viewer graphics context. You can compare the performance of both options to see which one works best with your GPU or CPU and delivers the fastest interactive performance.

Renderer Type

The "Angle of View Type" control allows you to choose which axis is used on the lens when the Focal Length and Angle of View value is computed.

The "Angle of View" control allows you to change the camera field of view setting in degrees used for the panoramic view extraction. The "Focal Length (mm)" control is linked together with the Angle of View control so you can use either slider and achieve the same field of view result.

The "Film Gate", "Aperture Width", "Aperture Height", and "Lens Shift X" and Y values are used to match your Fusion macro based extracted camera view against a traditional photographic lens based camera parameter.

The "Lens Shift X" and "Lens Shift Y" parameters allow you to adjust the 2D filmback based centering of the lens compared to the origin of a theoretical film back on the camera.

The "Rotation Order" control allows you to control the precedence for each of the rotation axis. This is helpful when you need to solve gimbal lock by selecting the most important rotation channel for your camera animation and making it the first of the three axes listed in the Rotation Order settings.

The X Rotation/Y Rotation/Z Rotation sliders are used to spin the orientation of the view around and can be used to level the horizon. The "Z Rotation" slider lets you perform a horizontal panning effect on the camera view which can be used to adjust and re-center the front facing part of the panoramic image.

The "Lock X/Y/Z" checkbox will link together the "Scale" control into a single unified slider. When this slider is un-checked you will have direct control over the Scale X/Scale Y/Scale Z controls which allow for non-proportional scaling.

The Scale control allows you to change the size of the mesh used in the texture baking operation. If the model is extremely large or small it can be helpful to change the scale setting control so the model fits within Fusion's default near and far clipping plane regions.

If you disable the "Lock X/Y/Z" checkbox you can create cartoon like squash and stretch distortions in the environment map imagery by doubling the Scale value on a single axis in relation to the other scale controls.

The node has two inputs which are labelled "Left" and "Right". The node has a two outputs called "LeftOutput" and "RightOutput".

ViewerMeshStereo Node

Note: If the ViewerMesh texture baking operation doesn't seem to have the correct "infinite" like look to the panoramic image conversion it is usually an indication the scale control needs to be adjusted to fix the issue.